Showing posts tagged as "Exhibit updates"

How do you display deep-sea cephalopods like this vampire squid? It takes a big ship, a lot of scientists, and a robot. Learn how we do it, with the help of our colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, in our latest podcast.

Long-Distance Flyers
Think you travel a lot? The diminutive red knot probably has you beat, traveling from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego—a distance of 9,300 miles each way—each year. And it does it all under its own steam.
We just added two of these long distance flyers to our Aviary exhibit. You can also view them on our live web cam.
While red knots could put most business travelers to shame, ours have been forced to stick closer to home, due to permanent wing injuries. The pair (a male and female) flew here—in a plane—from the Florida Aquarium, which has hosted them for more than a decade.

Reading up on Red Knots
Red knots (Calidris canutus) are one of the larger sandpipers, and can live to a ripe age. Scientists recently discovered a 21-year-old. 
The birds, which grow to 10 inches, can occasionally be seen in local estuaries such as Elkhorn Slough. But these sightings are rare. These mileage champs breed in some of the coldest places in the world, and winter in some of the hottest. While they travel vast distances, red knots depend on certain stops along the way to fuel up, such as in Hudson Bay and Brazil. This can create challenges for the birds if food sources—particularly horseshoe crab eggs—are in short supply due to overharvesting.
“We’re really excited to have them,” says aviculturist Eric Miller. “Though they’re not technically endangered, red knots in some parts of the world are declining, and this is a great chance for people to see them.”

Long-Distance Flyers

Think you travel a lot? The diminutive red knot probably has you beat, traveling from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego—a distance of 9,300 miles each way—each year. And it does it all under its own steam.

We just added two of these long distance flyers to our Aviary exhibit. You can also view them on our live web cam.

While red knots could put most business travelers to shame, ours have been forced to stick closer to home, due to permanent wing injuries. The pair (a male and female) flew here—in a plane—from the Florida Aquarium, which has hosted them for more than a decade.

Reading up on Red Knots

Red knots (Calidris canutus) are one of the larger sandpipers, and can live to a ripe age. Scientists recently discovered a 21-year-old

The birds, which grow to 10 inches, can occasionally be seen in local estuaries such as Elkhorn Slough. But these sightings are rare. These mileage champs breed in some of the coldest places in the world, and winter in some of the hottest. While they travel vast distances, red knots depend on certain stops along the way to fuel up, such as in Hudson Bay and Brazil. This can create challenges for the birds if food sources—particularly horseshoe crab eggs—are in short supply due to overharvesting.

“We’re really excited to have them,” says aviculturist Eric Miller. “Though they’re not technically endangered, red knots in some parts of the world are declining, and this is a great chance for people to see them.”

Sun seeker? During the day, the spotted jelly travels upward, orienting itself for maximum sun exposure.  It’s also known as a “lagoon jelly” because it lives in bays, harbors and lagoons in the South Pacific. But you don’t need to go that far—they’re on exhibit now in the Jellies Experience! Learn more about the spotted jelly Learn more about the Jellies Experience (Staci Vriese)

Sun seeker? During the day, the spotted jelly travels upward, orienting itself for maximum sun exposure.  It’s also known as a “lagoon jelly” because it lives in bays, harbors and lagoons in the South Pacific. But you don’t need to go that far—they’re on exhibit now in the Jellies Experience!

Learn more about the spotted jelly 

Learn more about the Jellies Experience

(Staci Vriese)

Happy #Friday! Love sharks? We just added a beautiful female sevengill to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit! It’s 59 inches long and weighs just over 30 pounds. Learn more Learn how we’re helping save sharks(Christopher Michel)

Happy #Friday! Love sharks? We just added a beautiful female sevengill to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit! It’s 59 inches long and weighs just over 30 pounds.

Learn more 

Learn how we’re helping save sharks

(Christopher Michel)

Menace or merely misunderstood? Despite appearances, the monkeyface-eel isn’t a true eel—and it definitely doesn’t act like one. This reclusive fish seldom travels more than 15 feet from its home, and mostly eats algae.Learn more(Photo: Charlene Boarts)

Menace or merely misunderstood? Despite appearances, the monkeyface-eel isn’t a true eel—and it definitely doesn’t act like one. This reclusive fish seldom travels more than 15 feet from its home, and mostly eats algae.

Learn more

(Photo: Charlene Boarts)

Can’t stop watching this strolling cephalopod? Don’t be fooled by its delicate movement—the mimic octopus can easily scare off potential predators. In a flash, this master of mimicry changes its color and shape to hover like a lethal lionfish or slither like a poisonous sea snake. Learn more

Can’t stop watching this strolling cephalopod? Don’t be fooled by its delicate movement—the mimic octopus can easily scare off potential predators. In a flash, this master of mimicry changes its color and shape to hover like a lethal lionfish or slither like a poisonous sea snake. 

Learn more

Need a cool image to enliven your computer desktop? How about this crazy cock-eyed squid? 
We’re displaying amazing deep-sea cephalopods like the cock-eyed squid in Tentacles with the help of our sister organization, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). These animals come and go so check here and on our Facebook page for the latest!View all our wallpapers

Need a cool image to enliven your computer desktop? How about this crazy cock-eyed squid?

We’re displaying amazing deep-sea cephalopods like the cock-eyed squid in Tentacles with the help of our sister organization, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). These animals come and go so check here and on our Facebook page for the latest!

View all our wallpapers


Is your garden thriving this summer? So is ours! This gorgeous giant kelp grows rapidly—up to 20 inches per day under ideal conditions in the bay.View our live kelp forest cam(Photo: Charlene Boarts)

Is your garden thriving this summer? So is ours! This gorgeous giant kelp grows rapidly—up to 20 inches per day under ideal conditions in the bay.

View our live kelp forest cam

(Photo: Charlene Boarts)

Have you seen them? Iridescent pelagic cormorants are nesting below our decks. Watch these diving birds swoop and plunge for seaweed nesting material and fishy snacks for their chicks. Thanks to member Gene Barclift for these fun #FanFriday photos!

Learn more

Happy #Friday! There’s nothing common about this cuttlefish: the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis)  uses its skin to communicate—flashing stripes and patches of color convey threats or courtship messages. We’ve raised generations of them at the Aquarium.

On exhibit in Tentacles!

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.