Showing posts tagged as "Exhibit updates"

We recently saw a blue whale from our Great Tide Pool deck—the largest animal on the planet! It’s an early sighting, as we normally don’t see blues until June.Watch our live bay cam

We recently saw a blue whale from our Great Tide Pool deck—the largest animal on the planet! It’s an early sighting, as we normally don’t see blues until June.

Watch our live bay cam


More egg madness in our otter exhibit—have a great #Easter weekend! Watch the cuteness live

More egg madness in our otter exhibit—have a great #Easter weekend!

Watch the cuteness live


Our otters are already enjoying an egg-cellent Easter weekend. You? The Aquarium’s clever staff really outdid themselves with these ice eggs—the “frosting” is made from ground clams. Yum! Learn more about our otters—and how we’re helping save this threatened species

Our otters are already enjoying an egg-cellent Easter weekend. You? The Aquarium’s clever staff really outdid themselves with these ice eggs—the “frosting” is made from ground clams. Yum!

Learn more about our otters—and how we’re helping save this threatened species


Have you had a chance to visit our Tentacles special exhibition yet? If not, this video tour might convince you!

Learn more about the exhibit


Beautiful, mysterious—and little changed in 150-million years. Have you seen them? We have chambered nautilus in our new special exhibition, Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes.

Learn more about nautilus


Let the magic begin! Our Tentacles special exhibition is now open. Hope you get a chance to visit!Learn more about the exhibitLearn more about the flamboyant cuttlefish(Michael Fiala/Reuters)

Let the magic begin! Our Tentacles special exhibition is now open. Hope you get a chance to visit!

Learn more about the exhibit

Learn more about the flamboyant cuttlefish

(Michael Fiala/Reuters)

Can you find the cuttlefish? Come make your own discoveries this weekend at the Aquarium—we’ll have longer hours April 12-27 in honor of spring break (and our new exhibit): 9:30 am to 6 pm (9 am on weekends for members).Learn more

Can you find the cuttlefish? Come make your own discoveries this weekend at the Aquarium—we’ll have longer hours April 12-27 in honor of spring break (and our new exhibit): 9:30 am to 6 pm (9 am on weekends for members).

Learn more


How do you polish a 13-inch-thick, 54-foot-long window? Find out in our latest podcast! 

We’ve posted photos of the amazing bigfin reef squid before—but no two images are alike! Like many cephalopods, these squid use pigmented skin cells, called chromatophores, to change color and pattern.

Check them out when Tentacles opens April 12 

Enter to win a behind-the-scenes tour


Coming in Like a Lion(fish)

March is supposed to come in like a lion and go out like a lamb as stormy winter weather gives way to a milder spring. Now April is coming in like a lion, too – with the latest addition to our Splash Zone galleries.

The new arrival – the captivating and beautiful lionfish – isn’t just another pretty face. It’s an infamous fish that carries an important conservation message.

Far from Home

Native to the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, lionfish are fabulous residents of their home waters. Unfortunately, they were introduced to waters off the U.S. east coast in the mid-1980s and are now a destructive invasive species from the mid-Atlantic through Florida, the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and into Central and South America.

Cause for Concern 

Their fluttering maroon-and-white-striped dorsal fins hide venomous spines that require our husbandry teams to take extra precautions around them. Yet the bigger concern is the threat these fish pose to ecosystems in waters where they don’t belong.

Invasive lionfish have no natural predators outside their home waters, and they compete with native fish for both food and habitat. Lionfish have a hearty appetite for commercially and ecologically important native fish species, and are able to thrive in waters from the shoreline to depths of more than 400 feet. In warmer waters, females are capable of spawning 30,000 eggs every four days, making them prolific breeders and poster fish for invasive species.

The Edible Invader

Our exhibit lionfish were collected from the Florida Keys, where the species has taken a foot – or rather fin – hold since 2009.  Absent other lionfish predators, people have adopted the mantra “Eat ‘em to beat ‘em” to encourage consumption of these marine invaders. (They are as tasty as they are beautiful.)

Learn more about our conservation efforts.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.