Showing posts tagged as "SORAC"

Have you seen it? The full version of the award-winning PBS Nature film “Saving Otter 501” is back online!  You’ll be spellbound by the story of the Aquarium’s 501st attempt to save an orphaned sea otter. Watch nowLearn more about our sea otter program (Photo: Sea Studios Foundation)

Have you seen it? The full version of the award-winning PBS Nature film “Saving Otter 501” is back online!  You’ll be spellbound by the story of the Aquarium’s 501st attempt to save an orphaned sea otter.

Watch now

Learn more about our sea otter program 

(Photo: Sea Studios Foundation)

Did you enjoy “Saving Otter 501” on PBS Nature last night? You can help our efforts to save the threatened southern sea otter and other ocean animals!Learn more about all our conservation efforts
Tonight on PBS Nature: the Aquarium attempts its 501st sea otter rescue.Check local listingsLearn more about our sea otter program

Tonight on PBS Nature: the Aquarium attempts its 501st sea otter rescue.

Check local listings

Learn more about our sea otter program


Remember hearing about Juno, the rescued pup that was reared behind the scenes by our exhibit otter, Ivy? Looks like she’s thriving at her new home at the Oregon Zoo!

Learn how we’re helping save sea otters

(Shervin Hess/Oregon Zoo)

Remember Kit? She’s back on exhibit, after doing surrogate mom duties behind the scenes for a rescued pup. The hotel is pretty full right now, with four otters: Kit, Ivy, Gidget and Abby!Watch the madness liveLearn how we’re helping save sea otters

Remember Kit? She’s back on exhibit, after doing surrogate mom duties behind the scenes for a rescued pup. The hotel is pretty full right now, with four otters: Kit, Ivy, Gidget and Abby!

Watch the madness live

Learn how we’re helping save sea otters

Hello from Oregon!

Remember otter 649, the rescued male sea otter pup that was on exhibit for several months with companion otter, Gidget? We’re happy to announce he has a new name and a new home the Oregon Coast Aquarium. The orphaned pup was transported via private plane from Monterey to his new home in Newport, Oregon.

He was the 649th stranded otter to be brought into our sea otter program since 1984 and was only the sixth pup ever to go on exhibit.

Oswald had a furry companion on the plane, Juno— a female sea otter who stranded two months after Oswald and was also rescued and rehabilitated by our sea otter staff. Unlike 649 who was reared on exhibit, Juno was raised behind the scenes with surrogate mother Ivy. Our veterinarian, Dr. Mike Murray, and a mammalogist, escorted the two otters on the flight north. Juno’s found a new home at the Oregon Zoowhere animal caregivers look forward to introducing the youngster to their two resident adult sea otters. Both Oswald and Juno will make their public debuts this summer. 

We partner with Association of Zoos and Aquariums facilities across the country, like Oregon Coast Aquarium and Oregon Zoo, to find good homes for sea otters that can’t be released back to the wild.

Rearing animals like Oswald and Juno for lives at other homes when they aren’t candidates for release to the wild is helping the overall California sea otter population. Today, 36 rescued pups reared by surrogates in Monterey inspire millions of visitors at a dozen top aquariums and zoos in North America. Our resident sea otters and their predecessors have also raised dozens of pups that are back in the wild and having babies of their own.

Curious which otters are in the Sea Otter Exhibit now? Find out on our live web cam


Help Us Find the Person Who Shot Three Sea Otters
In early September 2013, members of our Sea Otter Research and Conservation team recovered three sea otters that had been shot to death near Asilomar Beach, in Pacific Grove. State and federal authorities are actively investigating the fatal shootings, and now they need your help finding the perpetrator.
We and other sea otter conservation groups are offering a $21,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the crime.
Southern sea otters are slowly recovering after being driven nearly to extinction by fur traders in the 19th century. Today, they’re protected under federal law by the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Killing a California (or southern) sea otter is a crime punishable by federal and state fines, and possible jail time. 
If you have any information about the shootings, contact Special Agent Souphanya of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at 650-876-9078. Anonymous reports can also be made by calling the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contact line at 703-358-1949, or the California Department of Fish and Wildlife CalTIP line at 1-888-DFG-CALTIP.
Reward contributions have been provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Defenders of Wildlife, Friends of the Sea Otter, the Humane Society of the United States, the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, The U.C. Davis Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center and private individuals.
The California Department of Fish and Wildlife is providing a portion of the reward money from the California Sea Otter Fund, which is financed by voluntary contributions from state taxpayers. The fund helps support sea otter research and conservation, including the investigation of sea otter deaths and the enforcement of laws protecting sea otters. When filling out your California income tax form 540, look for line 410, labeled California Sea Otter Fund, under Contributions. 
Learn more about the California Sea Otter Fund.

Help Us Find the Person Who Shot Three Sea Otters

In early September 2013, members of our Sea Otter Research and Conservation team recovered three sea otters that had been shot to death near Asilomar Beach, in Pacific Grove. State and federal authorities are actively investigating the fatal shootings, and now they need your help finding the perpetrator.

We and other sea otter conservation groups are offering a $21,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the crime.

Southern sea otters are slowly recovering after being driven nearly to extinction by fur traders in the 19th century. Today, they’re protected under federal law by the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Killing a California (or southern) sea otter is a crime punishable by federal and state fines, and possible jail time.

If you have any information about the shootings, contact Special Agent Souphanya of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at 650-876-9078. Anonymous reports can also be made by calling the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contact line at 703-358-1949, or the California Department of Fish and Wildlife CalTIP line at 1-888-DFG-CALTIP.

Reward contributions have been provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Defenders of Wildlife, Friends of the Sea Otter, the Humane Society of the United States, the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, The U.C. Davis Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center and private individuals.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife is providing a portion of the reward money from the California Sea Otter Fund, which is financed by voluntary contributions from state taxpayers. The fund helps support sea otter research and conservation, including the investigation of sea otter deaths and the enforcement of laws protecting sea otters. When filling out your California income tax form 540, look for line 410, labeled California Sea Otter Fund, under Contributions.

Learn more about the California Sea Otter Fund.

My, how the cuteness grows! Otter 649 weighed less than seven pounds when rescued in November. Since going on exhibit January 21, the plump pup has reached a portly 19 pounds.

Learn more about Otter 649 and how we’re helping save sea otters

Have you seen our auditorium presentation, “Luna: A Sea Otter’s Story”? Well, the real-life Luna, who was featured in the PBS Nature program, “Saving Otter 501,” recently had her second pup in the wild, according to our otter spotters. That’s good news for Luna, and for sea otter conservation.

Learn how we’re helping save sea otters.

(©Sea Studios Foundation)

Can you find the sea otter mom and pup in all the photos? We’re so lucky to have an area like this where animals can come in with the tides, help educate our guests about the wonders of Monterey Bay, then return to their natural home. (The pair was with us for just a day last week.)

Learn how we’re helping save sea otters

(Monterey Bay Aquarium/Tyson Rininger)

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.