Showing posts tagged as "african blackfooted penguin"

Ever seen a penguin while it’s still in the egg? This photo was taken very early in the chick’s development—the largest red dot is the embryo. Our aviculturists hold eggs to the light, a process called candling, to monitor development during the incubation process.

Welcome to our new penguin chick! This adorable African blackfooted penguin hatched the morning of August 15 in an incubator behind the scenes. During an exam today, the chick weighed in at 8.5 ounces (245 grams), more than three times its weight after hatching – a great sign that it’s eating well.

The young chick, whose gender is unknown, is now being cared for by its foster parents on exhibit in the “Splash Zone” family gallery. “We’re very excited to welcome our fourth-ever penguin chick,” said Aimee Greenebaum, associate curator of aviculture. “It’s fun to have a youngster around again.”

But Greenebaum cautions that despite excellent parental and veterinary care, blackfooted penguin chicks have a high rate of mortality.

Experienced foster parents Walvis and Boulders are raising the chick because genetic parents Bee and Geyser are inexperienced at parenting. The chick will remain with Walvis and Boulders for about three weeks or until it starts leaving its nest.

At that time, the family will be moved behind the scenes for the chick’s safety and will rejoin the colony on exhibit about three months later. Chances are that the chick will not be visible during the first few weeks as it’s still hiding under its parents and not peeking out much. 

This is the fourth chick hatched in the penguin colony at the Aquarium. All of the birds are part of a Species Survival Plan for threatened African blackfooted penguins.

What do the bands mean on these African blackfooted penguins? Any guesses?

What do the bands mean on these African blackfooted penguins? Any guesses?

Hey, were you talking to me? Actually, this African blackfooted penguin is probably looking for an afternoon snack. Penguins consume 14% of their body weight daily. For a human, that’s like eating 21 pounds of food!

Hey, were you talking to me? Actually, this African blackfooted penguin is probably looking for an afternoon snack. Penguins consume 14% of their body weight daily. For a human, that’s like eating 21 pounds of food!

What do our African blackfooted penguins do for fun? In this photo, Tola plays with some plastic hoops in an “enrichment” activity—one of many designed to keep our animals stimulated and healthy. You can see them in the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Splash Zone exhibit!

What do our African blackfooted penguins do for fun? In this photo, Tola plays with some plastic hoops in an “enrichment” activity—one of many designed to keep our animals stimulated and healthy. You can see them in the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Splash Zone exhibit!

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.