Showing posts tagged as "deep sea"

Killer sponges! Sounds like creatures from a B-grade horror movie, doesn’t it? In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Learn more about the latest finds from our sister organization, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).


It’s #WeirdWednesday, and we can count on our friends at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute to captivate us with creepiness. 
Follow them on Facebook and learn more about the deep sea!

It’s #WeirdWednesday, and we can count on our friends at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute to captivate us with creepiness.

Follow them on Facebook and learn more about the deep sea!

High drama in the deep sea! Watch as a squid captures and eventually strangles an owlfish in this amazing video, captured by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute using a remotely operated vehicle.

What caused the demise of the dinosaurs? MBARI researchers find evidence along an immense underwater cliff in the Gulf of Mexico.

Learn more.

Battle of the (tiny) titans: five-inch squid attacks owlfish. Owlfish definitely loses!
Here’s the full story, according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute’s expedition blog: 
“Most of the time we spend flying through the midwater with the ROV, we see a whole lot of marine snow. Every once in a while we see something that makes us all stop and say - WOW! Yesterday was one of those days! This small squid, Gonatus onyx, managed to catch this large owlfish and despite its eyes being too big for its stomach, it was determined to win the battle!”
Follow the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook for more amazing deep-sea stories.
 

Battle of the (tiny) titans: five-inch squid attacks owlfish. Owlfish definitely loses!

Here’s the full story, according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute’s expedition blog

Most of the time we spend flying through the midwater with the ROV, we see a whole lot of marine snow. Every once in a while we see something that makes us all stop and say - WOW! Yesterday was one of those days! This small squid, Gonatus onyx, managed to catch this large owlfish and despite its eyes being too big for its stomach, it was determined to win the battle!”

Follow the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook for more amazing deep-sea stories.

 

Seen any of these creatures lately? We doubt it, since they live thousands of feet underwater! They’re just a sample of the amazing, deep-sea animals found on the recent Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) Midwater Ecology Expedition, which is documenting the effects of declining oxygen concentrations on midwater communities.
Follow their mission.

Seen any of these creatures lately? We doubt it, since they live thousands of feet underwater! They’re just a sample of the amazing, deep-sea animals found on the recent Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) Midwater Ecology Expedition, which is documenting the effects of declining oxygen concentrations on midwater communities.

Follow their mission.

Animals living on the abyssal plains, miles below the ocean surface, don’t usually get much to eat. Their main source of food is ”marine snow”—a slow drift of mucus, fecal pellets, and body parts—that sinks down from the surface waters. However, researchers have long been puzzled by the fact that, over the long term, the steady fall of marine snow cannot account for all the food consumed by animals and microbes living in the sediment. A new paper by MBARI researcher Ken Smith and his colleagues shows that population booms of algae or animals near the sea surface can sometimes result in huge pulses of organic material sinking to the deep seafloor. In a few weeks, such deep-sea “feasts” can deliver as much food to deep-sea animals as would normally arrive over years or even decades of typical marine snow.

Learn more

This #Halloween, we think you’ll agree: the eyes definitely have it!

Follow the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook.

Fifteen-foot white shark bites robot? Now that’s a battle of the titans! An underwater research robot from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute recently came back with shark teeth embedded in its aluminum hull.
This underwater robot, known as Tethys, just came back from two continuous weeks at sea, helping MBARI scientists monitor harmful algal blooms as part of the Fall 2013 CANON experiment. When MBARI engineers pulled the long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LR-AUV) from the water they discovered large scrapes on its sides. Based on the gape of the bite mark, shark expert Dave Ebert from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories estimates that it was a 15-foot-long white shark that attacked the AUV!
Learn more by following MBARI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MBARInews

Fifteen-foot white shark bites robot? Now that’s a battle of the titans! An underwater research robot from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute recently came back with shark teeth embedded in its aluminum hull.

This underwater robot, known as Tethys, just came back from two continuous weeks at sea, helping MBARI scientists monitor harmful algal blooms as part of the Fall 2013 CANON experiment. When MBARI engineers pulled the long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LR-AUV) from the water they discovered large scrapes on its sides. Based on the gape of the bite mark, shark expert Dave Ebert from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories estimates that it was a 15-foot-long white shark that attacked the AUV!

Learn more by following MBARI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MBARInews

Getting in the Halloween spirit yet? Behold this week’s #WeirdWednesday photo: the shiny loosejaw! Unearth more ocean mysteries by following the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook! 
This fish is from the family dragonfishes, and lives in pelagic waters to depths up to 1,200 meters (almost 4,000 feet). It has red light organs, or photophores, beneath its eyes. Red luminescence is rare in the deep sea and most deep-sea animals can not see red light. The shiny loosejaw can see red - essentially providing themselves with their own night vision goggles! It also has a long chin barbel for luring prey.

Getting in the Halloween spirit yet? Behold this week’s #WeirdWednesday photo: the shiny loosejaw! Unearth more ocean mysteries by following the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook

This fish is from the family dragonfishes, and lives in pelagic waters to depths up to 1,200 meters (almost 4,000 feet). It has red light organs, or photophores, beneath its eyes. Red luminescence is rare in the deep sea and most deep-sea animals can not see red light. The shiny loosejaw can see red - essentially providing themselves with their own night vision goggles! It also has a long chin barbel for luring prey.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.