Showing posts tagged as "endangered species"

Look Who’s Headed to Monterey!
On Thursday, we returned one young loggerhead sea turtle to North Carolina for release back to the wild. Today, this hatchling will make the trip to the West Coast for a year-long stay on exhibit in our Open Sea galleries.
It will arrive tonight and go straight from the airport to the exhibit.
You can follow the journey on Twitter by tracking #TravelingTurtle.
This new #TravelingTurtle, like its predecessor, was late to emerge from its nest on a North Carolina beach. It was rescued, along with other laggard hatchlings, and raised by colleagues at the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores.
The rescued turtles are loaned to aquariums around the country as a way to share the story of this endangered species while the youngsters grow large enough for release.
Our first turtle weighed less than half a pound and measured nearly 4 1/2 inches when it arrived. Yesterday it was nearly 10 inches long and weighed almost 5 pounds.
The new turtle will also be relatively tiny — and will grow impressively fast.
And when it’s big enough, it will again be a #TravelingTurtle: from Monterey to North Carolina to the wild Atlantic.
Learn more about our first #TravelingTurtle.
Support our conservation work with a gift to our Fund for the Animals.
Photo courtesy North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores.

Look Who’s Headed to Monterey!

On Thursday, we returned one young loggerhead sea turtle to North Carolina for release back to the wild. Today, this hatchling will make the trip to the West Coast for a year-long stay on exhibit in our Open Sea galleries.

It will arrive tonight and go straight from the airport to the exhibit.

You can follow the journey on Twitter by tracking #TravelingTurtle.

This new #TravelingTurtle, like its predecessor, was late to emerge from its nest on a North Carolina beach. It was rescued, along with other laggard hatchlings, and raised by colleagues at the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores.

The rescued turtles are loaned to aquariums around the country as a way to share the story of this endangered species while the youngsters grow large enough for release.

Our first turtle weighed less than half a pound and measured nearly 4 1/2 inches when it arrived. Yesterday it was nearly 10 inches long and weighed almost 5 pounds.

The new turtle will also be relatively tiny — and will grow impressively fast.

And when it’s big enough, it will again be a #TravelingTurtle: from Monterey to North Carolina to the wild Atlantic.

Learn more about our first #TravelingTurtle.

Support our conservation work with a gift to our Fund for the Animals.

Photo courtesy North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores.

Did you know that today is Endangered Species Day, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the federal Endangered Species Act? We rescue, study and care for many endangered species at the Aquarium, in cooperation with government agencies. These include snowy plovers, sharks, sea otters, penguins, rockfish and albatross. How will you celebrate this special day?
 Learn about all our research and conservation efforts.

Did you know that today is Endangered Species Day, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the federal Endangered Species Act? We rescue, study and care for many endangered species at the Aquarium, in cooperation with government agencies. These include snowy plovers, sharks, sea otters, penguins, rockfish and albatross. How will you celebrate this special day?

Learn about all our research and conservation efforts.

New Future for Great White Sharks?
 Should great white sharks in the Northeastern Pacific be placed on the endangered species list? That’s the issue being considered by Californa and U.S. wildlife officials, who have received petitions calling for protection under state and federal Endangered Species acts.
The Aquarium is very supportive of this process, and we’re assisting in any way we can so the final decision is based on the best, most current science.
Much of what’s known about the lives of adult and juvenile great white sharks today – from migration patterns and population size, to the contaminant levels in their tissues – is the result of studies in which the Aquarium, along with a broad consortium of scientists from Stanford, UC Davis, CSU Long Beach and other institutions, has played a key role.
There’s more public concern about the future of great white sharks in part because we have, since 2004, introduced more than 3 million people to a half-dozen young sharks face-to-face in our Open Sea exhibit. Visitors tell us that the experience changed their attitudes and say they were inspired to help protect white sharks in the wild.
While the review process is under way, we’ve decided not to collect white sharks for exhibit. It’s our hope that any new policies protecting white sharks will allow for occasional exhibit of white sharks (before their return to the wild) and for a vigorous field research program. Both public engagement and research are essential to assure a future for white sharks.
Learn more about our white shark research program. 
 
 

New Future for Great White Sharks?

Should great white sharks in the Northeastern Pacific be placed on the endangered species list? That’s the issue being considered by Californa and U.S. wildlife officials, who have received petitions calling for protection under state and federal Endangered Species acts.

The Aquarium is very supportive of this process, and we’re assisting in any way we can so the final decision is based on the best, most current science.

Much of what’s known about the lives of adult and juvenile great white sharks today – from migration patterns and population size, to the contaminant levels in their tissues – is the result of studies in which the Aquarium, along with a broad consortium of scientists from Stanford, UC Davis, CSU Long Beach and other institutions, has played a key role.

There’s more public concern about the future of great white sharks in part because we have, since 2004, introduced more than 3 million people to a half-dozen young sharks face-to-face in our Open Sea exhibit. Visitors tell us that the experience changed their attitudes and say they were inspired to help protect white sharks in the wild.

While the review process is under way, we’ve decided not to collect white sharks for exhibit. It’s our hope that any new policies protecting white sharks will allow for occasional exhibit of white sharks (before their return to the wild) and for a vigorous field research program. Both public engagement and research are essential to assure a future for white sharks.

Learn more about our white shark research program.

 

 

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.