Showing posts tagged as "exhibit"

Always in awe: Our staff members share their favorite Aquarium spots, from cuttlefish to crashing waves.
Check out our newest podcast!

Always in awe: Our staff members share their favorite Aquarium spots, from cuttlefish to crashing waves.

Check out our newest podcast!

Can a simple seaweed encounter produce a future ocean advocate? We hope so! What does your child like about our touch pools?

Can a simple seaweed encounter produce a future ocean advocate? We hope so! What does your child like about our touch pools?

What do the bands mean on these African blackfooted penguins? Any guesses?

What do the bands mean on these African blackfooted penguins? Any guesses?

What’s going on here? Any guesses? Find out the answer.

What’s going on here? Any guesses? Find out the answer.

Hey, were you talking to me? Actually, this African blackfooted penguin is probably looking for an afternoon snack. Penguins consume 14% of their body weight daily. For a human, that’s like eating 21 pounds of food!

Hey, were you talking to me? Actually, this African blackfooted penguin is probably looking for an afternoon snack. Penguins consume 14% of their body weight daily. For a human, that’s like eating 21 pounds of food!

What’s your guess: is this a real jelly? Learn how our exhibits staff dreams up the displays you enjoy every time you visit, in our latest podcast!

What’s your guess: is this a real jelly? Learn how our exhibits staff dreams up the displays you enjoy every time you visit, in our latest podcast!

Male or female? Male sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) are larger, with black tail and head sections; and wide, reddish orange midriffs. Female sheephead are dull pink with white undersides. To make things more confusing, all sheephead are born female, and change sex following environmental clues we don’t fully understand. Ever spotted one in our Kelp Forest exhibit? Male or female?

Male or female? Male sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcherare larger, with black tail and head sections; and wide, reddish orange midriffs. Female sheephead are dull pink with white undersides. To make things more confusing, all sheephead are born female, and change sex following environmental clues we don’t fully understand. Ever spotted one in our Kelp Forest exhibit? Male or female?

A face only a mother could love? The wolf eel looks vicious and if you put a finger in that mouth, you’d regret it. But despite this scary appearance, they’re slow and would prefer to just be left alone!

A face only a mother could love? The wolf eel looks vicious and if you put a finger in that mouth, you’d regret it. But despite this scary appearance, they’re slow and would prefer to just be left alone!

Did you know that in 2011 blackfooted penguin chicks were born on exhibit for the first time ever? Pebble and Tola are grown up now but you can see them on exhibit in our Splash Zone. Check out one of our feedings daily at 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.!

Did you know that in 2011 blackfooted penguin chicks were born on exhibit for the first time ever? Pebble and Tola are grown up now but you can see them on exhibit in our Splash Zone. Check out one of our feedings daily at 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.!

We’ve recently had California market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) laying eggs in the sardine roundabout at the entrance to the Open Sea exhibit. You can see the tiny eggs indicated with an arrow in the photo!
We’ve had several batches of squid on exhibit recently. Our collectors obtain mature adults in Monterey Bay, some of which lay egg cases. In an attempt to culture more squid behind the scenes, guest experience ambassador Allen Protasio collects egg cases from these adults, removes them from exhibit, and puts them in a separate container behind the scenes. Before long, with careful aeration and water flow, embryos begin to develop. “From these egg cases we were able to get about 300 squid hatchlings,” says Allen. 
One caution: most squid on exhibit are mature adults, and they don’t last long. If you’re interested, feel free to ask one of our helpful staff whether we have any during your visit. 

We’ve recently had California market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) laying eggs in the sardine roundabout at the entrance to the Open Sea exhibit. You can see the tiny eggs indicated with an arrow in the photo!

We’ve had several batches of squid on exhibit recently. Our collectors obtain mature adults in Monterey Bay, some of which lay egg cases. In an attempt to culture more squid behind the scenes, guest experience ambassador Allen Protasio collects egg cases from these adults, removes them from exhibit, and puts them in a separate container behind the scenes. Before long, with careful aeration and water flow, embryos begin to develop. “From these egg cases we were able to get about 300 squid hatchlings,” says Allen. 

One caution: most squid on exhibit are mature adults, and they don’t last long. If you’re interested, feel free to ask one of our helpful staff whether we have any during your visit. 

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.