Showing posts tagged as "exhibit update"

Did you know that the guitarfish has been playing it flat for 100 million years? We now have three making beautiful music together in our Aviary. It gets its name from a long, pointed snout and guitar-shaped body. It lies in ambush with its eyes sticking out of the sand, waiting for careless crabs to wander by. Lunch!Learn more  (Paul Vineyard photo)

Did you know that the guitarfish has been playing it flat for 100 million years? We now have three making beautiful music together in our Aviary. It gets its name from a long, pointed snout and guitar-shaped body. It lies in ambush with its eyes sticking out of the sand, waiting for careless crabs to wander by. Lunch!

Learn more  

(Paul Vineyard photo)

Home sweet home! Watch our veined octopus set up camp in a glass jar.

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The female giant Pacific octopus has laid eggs! Look for a cluster attached to rocks in the top left corner of the right-hand exhibit. A female lays tens of thousands of eggs, in strands of about 250. 
It’s unlikely that these particular eggs are fertile or will produce baby octopuses, however. The urge to lay eggs comes just once, and usually marks the end of the octopus’s life. It’s all part of the natural cycle for these magical and intelligent animals.
Learn more about the giant Pacific octopus. 
©Charlene Boarts

The female giant Pacific octopus has laid eggs! Look for a cluster attached to rocks in the top left corner of the right-hand exhibit. A female lays tens of thousands of eggs, in strands of about 250. 

It’s unlikely that these particular eggs are fertile or will produce baby octopuses, however. The urge to lay eggs comes just once, and usually marks the end of the octopus’s life. It’s all part of the natural cycle for these magical and intelligent animals.

Learn more about the giant Pacific octopus

©Charlene Boarts

It takes two hands and a firm grip to hang onto the penguin chick that hatched in late August. After one week, it weighed 8.5 ounces; it now weighs more than eight times that much! We’re working behind the scenes with the little guy, getting it comfortable around people as preparation for eventual re-introduction to the Splash Zone exhibit.

Learn more about our chick and this threatened species

These (eight) arms are for hugging!  We’d love to know: how would you handle an octopus embrace?

Learn more about the giant Pacific Octopus.

Learn more about “Tentacles,” our special exhibition opening next spring.

 

Hey, where’d he go? Can you find the octopus in the second shot? We’re working behind the scenes with the algae octopus (and many other species) in preparation for “Tentacles,” our special exhibition opening next spring.

Learn more.

Bringing You Behind the Scenes: A Look Inside Our “Tentacles” Laboratory

Ever wonder how you raise a baby squid? No one knows for sure, but if you’re Aquarist Chris Payne, you start with a trip to the hardware store for these unlikely ingredients: fishing line, plastic ties and Super Glue.

“The eggs need to be suspended in water, just like they are in the wild,” Chris says of cultivating bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) eggs. He explains that these squid attach their eggs to rocks or corals—anywhere they can be hidden. To replicate this behind the scenes, our aquarists rig up cool contraptions like this one—an inventive way of hanging the eggs in order for them to hatch. 

The aquarists cleverly use monofilament line to sew through the tips of the pods, or “fingers,” gather them in small clusters, then suspend them using plastic ties. But other methods work, too. “It doesn’t matter how you hang them. We’ve even Super-Glued them to a solid structure hanging just below the surface of the water,” Chris says. 

We’re currently raising about 300 pods, each containing two to six embryos. Suspending the eggs also allows aquarists to observe their growth. “You can actually see the embryo developing inside,” Chris says. The eggs grow in the three-inch pods for two to three weeks, and swell in size before hatching out. The squid are barely a quarter-inch long when they hatch but can grow to more than a foot. 

Bigfin reef squid are just one of the fascinating species that’ll be on exhibit in “Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes,” opening next spring. It’ll feature a dozen species of octopuses and their kin—some of which have never been shown before. 

As our aquarists work to cultivate and care for these mysterious creatures, we’ll be sharing more behind-the-scenes stories like this. So stay tuned!

Learn more about “Tentacles”






Can you find them? We just added adult market squid to the anchovies exhibit in the Open Sea. Staffer Joe Welsh collected them in the bay last week. It’s one more species you might see in “Tentacles,” our special exhibition opening next spring. Check out these squid soon if you’re interested, as they don’t live long!
 
Learn more about Tentacles, our forthcoming exhibit.
 
 
Can you find them? We just added adult market squid to the anchovies exhibit in the Open Sea. Staffer Joe Welsh collected them in the bay last week. It’s one more species you might see in “Tentacles,” our special exhibition opening next spring. Check out these squid soon if you’re interested, as they don’t live long!
 
 
The Secret Lives of Seahorses closes this Monday, Sept. 2, so stop by the Aquarium to see these fascinating fishes before we wish them a fond farewell! Thanks to all of you who’ve loved this exhibit and made it such a great success.

The Secret Lives of Seahorses closes this Monday, Sept. 2, so stop by the Aquarium to see these fascinating fishes before we wish them a fond farewell! Thanks to all of you who’ve loved this exhibit and made it such a great success.

Are you or your kids fans of “Finding Nemo”? Well, we’ve got good news in the Splash Zone. We have many baby “Nemos” (clownfish), “Dory” (palette tang), “Bubbles” (yellow surgeonfish), “Gill” (Moorish idols), “Crush” (sea turtle) and Sheldon (yellow seahorse). Ask our guides to help you find them! 

Learn more.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.