Showing posts tagged as "exhibit updates"

Some appetite! Our recently hatched common murre chicks are behind the scenes eating (and eating, and eating) in preparation for going on exhibit. It’s the first time we’ve ever had baby murres at the Aquarium!
The eggs, from different mothers, were taken behind the scenes and incubated by our aviculture staff. They hatched August 29 and 30. We take them behind the scenes for their health and safety, rather than keep them in a busy exhibit environment.
The chicks’ mothers have been with us for many years. One was rescued from the Apex Houston oil spill, which occurred off the northern California coast in January 1986. (In fact, at least one Aquarium employee, Janet Covell, was on the scene helping rescue murres.) Our pair was declared non-releasable by California Fish and Wildlife, and was raised at the Aquarium.
Although the species is not currently listed as threatened, all shorebirds face pressures from habitat damage and pollution. The chicks are being raised at the Aquarium under the auspices of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan (SSP). 
The youngsters are growing fast and being hand-fed small fish every few hours, from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. It’s a lot of work! We expect them to be big enough to go on exhibit in in mid October.
 “We’re really excited to have these chicks at the Aquarium,” says Aimee Greenebaum, associate curator of aviculture. “Especially since they were born to rescued mothers that have been here for a long time. It’s a great success story. Plus—they’re so cute!”
Watch our murres live in the Aviary
Learn more about the common murre

 

Some appetite! Our recently hatched common murre chicks are behind the scenes eating (and eating, and eating) in preparation for going on exhibit. It’s the first time we’ve ever had baby murres at the Aquarium!

The eggs, from different mothers, were taken behind the scenes and incubated by our aviculture staff. They hatched August 29 and 30. We take them behind the scenes for their health and safety, rather than keep them in a busy exhibit environment.

The chicks’ mothers have been with us for many years. One was rescued from the Apex Houston oil spill, which occurred off the northern California coast in January 1986. (In fact, at least one Aquarium employee, Janet Covell, was on the scene helping rescue murres.) Our pair was declared non-releasable by California Fish and Wildlife, and was raised at the Aquarium.

Although the species is not currently listed as threatened, all shorebirds face pressures from habitat damage and pollution. The chicks are being raised at the Aquarium under the auspices of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan (SSP). 

The youngsters are growing fast and being hand-fed small fish every few hours, from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. It’s a lot of work! We expect them to be big enough to go on exhibit in in mid October.

 “We’re really excited to have these chicks at the Aquarium,” says Aimee Greenebaum, associate curator of aviculture. “Especially since they were born to rescued mothers that have been here for a long time. It’s a great success story. Plus—they’re so cute!”

Watch our murres live in the Aviary

Learn more about the common murre

 

Happy Friday! Did you know that the Aquarium was built on the site of an old sardine cannery? In a sense, we’re still very much in the sardine business. We have thousands of these hypnotic fish, and they come to us through good relations with local fishermen. Watch them liveLearn why sardines are a Seafood Watch “Best Choice”

Happy Friday! Did you know that the Aquarium was built on the site of an old sardine cannery? In a sense, we’re still very much in the sardine business. We have thousands of these hypnotic fish, and they come to us through good relations with local fishermen.

Watch them live

Learn why sardines are a Seafood Watch “Best Choice”


Feeling trapped in your cubicle this #humpday? At least you’re not a bryozoan! This bizarre animal lives inside a tiny box-shaped chamber stuck to a blade of kelp, next to dozens of its kin. Learn more (Photo: Garry McCarthy)

Feeling trapped in your cubicle this #humpday? At least you’re not a bryozoan! This bizarre animal lives inside a tiny box-shaped chamber stuck to a blade of kelp, next to dozens of its kin.

Learn more

(Photo: Garry McCarthy)

Swimming scallops? This sandy seafloor resident doesn’t stick around—it claps its two shells together and jets off to escape being a sea star’s meal. Try to spot them in our Monterey Bay Habitats gallery(Photo: Steve Johnston)

Swimming scallops? This sandy seafloor resident doesn’t stick around—it claps its two shells together and jets off to escape being a sea star’s meal.

Try to spot them in our Monterey Bay Habitats gallery

(Photo: Steve Johnston)

Whales? Check. Dolphins? Check. Seals, sea lions and otters? Triple check! Monterey Bay is still teeming with marine mammals. On Friday, staff and guests spotted eight different species from our wildlife viewing station—in 30 minutes!

Learn more

(Top photo: Dan Albro, Bottom photos: Jim Capwell/Divecentral.com)

Have you seen these awesome thimble jellies (Linuche aquila) in the Jellies Experience? 

Sometimes we import our jellies, and sometimes, well, we get lucky: these were grown from polyps that our clever aquarists discovered on rocks in our tropical exhibits.

The medusae (bell) of thimble jellies grow and harvest algae, called zooxanthellae, for sustenance. That’s brown coloration you see in the photos. In nature, these jellies collect in bunches at the surface. Their polyps live in long chitonous tubes, which is very different from the typical fixed jellyfish polyp.

But beware: Thimble jellies are also responsible for “sea bathers eruption” in tropical climes, such as the Caribbean. When the jellies spawn and their larvae form, they get stuck in skin or bathing suits, with unpleasant results!

Learn more about the Jellies Experience

"My wife went on a four-month trip and left me with binoculars and a bird book. That’s how it all started. When you work with birds, you have to slow down. You have to think about everything—where you put your hands, what cues you give off. They’re so tuned in to body language.”
—Eric Miller, aviculturist#MyAquariumStory

"My wife went on a four-month trip and left me with binoculars and a bird book. That’s how it all started. When you work with birds, you have to slow down. You have to think about everything—where you put your hands, what cues you give off. They’re so tuned in to body language.”

—Eric Miller, aviculturist

#MyAquariumStory

Miss these masters of disguise? We did! Glad to say we once again have pharaoh cuttlefish on exhibit in Tentacles. Learn more about this special exhibition

Miss these masters of disguise? We did! Glad to say we once again have pharaoh cuttlefish on exhibit in Tentacles.

Learn more about this special exhibition

Your #Monday puzzler: Can you spot three sanddabs? These flatfish live life lying on their sides—and hiding in plain sight!Learn more (Photo: Charlene Boarts)

Your #Monday puzzler: Can you spot three sanddabs? These flatfish live life lying on their sides—and hiding in plain sight!

Learn more

(Photo: Charlene Boarts)

Rub-a-dub-dub, four otters in the tub! An ice bath may sound chilly, but sea otters have the world’s densest fur—over a million hairs per square inch. To keep their luxurious coats clean and waterproof, otters spend hours grooming! Watch the cuteness liveLearn how we’re helping save sea otters (Photo: Hannah Ban-Weiss)

Rub-a-dub-dub, four otters in the tub! An ice bath may sound chilly, but sea otters have the world’s densest fur—over a million hairs per square inch. To keep their luxurious coats clean and waterproof, otters spend hours grooming!

Watch the cuteness live

Learn how we’re helping save sea otters

 (Photo: Hannah Ban-Weiss)

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.