Showing posts tagged as "fish"

Could this be the best animal name ever? The “sarcastic fringehead” just loves life in a boot—watch it ambush an afternoon meal in this 12-second video. The fringehead is fiercely territorial, remaining close by its chosen rock crevice, empty shell—or whatever! 

Plan your visit


Did you know that the guitarfish has been playing it flat for 100 million years? We now have three making beautiful music together in our Aviary. It gets its name from a long, pointed snout and guitar-shaped body. It lies in ambush with its eyes sticking out of the sand, waiting for careless crabs to wander by. Lunch!Learn more  (Paul Vineyard photo)

Did you know that the guitarfish has been playing it flat for 100 million years? We now have three making beautiful music together in our Aviary. It gets its name from a long, pointed snout and guitar-shaped body. It lies in ambush with its eyes sticking out of the sand, waiting for careless crabs to wander by. Lunch!

Learn more  

(Paul Vineyard photo)

How would you like to be face-to-face with this fellow? Our divers don’t mind, and neither does the fish! We give our critically endangered black sea bass routine health checks and freshwater baths (to eliminate parasites), and just found out that the largest one weighs 230 pounds! 
Learn more about how we care for this endangered species

How would you like to be face-to-face with this fellow? Our divers don’t mind, and neither does the fish! We give our critically endangered black sea bass routine health checks and freshwater baths (to eliminate parasites), and just found out that the largest one weighs 230 pounds!

Learn more about how we care for this endangered species

Some divers call them “ping pong balls with fins.” Their real name is just as good: the Pacific spiny lumpsucker. We just added six to our Kelp Touchpool, hatched behind the scenes earlier this year. 

Some divers call them “ping pong balls with fins.” Their real name is just as good: the Pacific spiny lumpsucker. We just added six to our Kelp Touchpool, hatched behind the scenes earlier this year. 

Not-So-Hard-to-Find Nemos

Attention, “Finding Nemo” fans: we just added several dozen baby clownfish in our Splash Zone exhibit. And there’s more to come—we’ve got 250 behind the scenes, just waiting to make their debut alongside other “Finding Nemo” characters at the Aquarium.

“We patiently waited for the eggs to develop as the dad clownfish took great care of them,” said Raymond Direen, who cared for the brood with fellow aquarist Jenn Anstey. “The dad constantly used his pectoral fins to fan the eggs and keep them clean. After about two weeks, they separated from the father, and  morphed into little baby clownfish.

 “We’re pleased with the success and expect them to grow up good and healthy!” says Raymond.

Use this guide to find many of the “Finding Nemo” characters at the Aquarium.

Learn more about clownfish.

 

Getting in the Halloween spirit yet? Behold this week’s #WeirdWednesday photo: the shiny loosejaw! Unearth more ocean mysteries by following the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook! 
This fish is from the family dragonfishes, and lives in pelagic waters to depths up to 1,200 meters (almost 4,000 feet). It has red light organs, or photophores, beneath its eyes. Red luminescence is rare in the deep sea and most deep-sea animals can not see red light. The shiny loosejaw can see red - essentially providing themselves with their own night vision goggles! It also has a long chin barbel for luring prey.

Getting in the Halloween spirit yet? Behold this week’s #WeirdWednesday photo: the shiny loosejaw! Unearth more ocean mysteries by following the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Facebook

This fish is from the family dragonfishes, and lives in pelagic waters to depths up to 1,200 meters (almost 4,000 feet). It has red light organs, or photophores, beneath its eyes. Red luminescence is rare in the deep sea and most deep-sea animals can not see red light. The shiny loosejaw can see red - essentially providing themselves with their own night vision goggles! It also has a long chin barbel for luring prey.

Don’t frown. It’s almost the weekend‬! Any plans that involve our oceans? 
Thanks to Katherine Shah Photography. 

Don’t frown. It’s almost the weekend! Any plans that involve our oceans? 

Thanks to Katherine Shah Photography. 

Looking for a challenge? Next time you visit, see if you can find these tiny sanddabs hidden in the sand in the Sandy Seafloor gallery. We guarantee it will be worth the search. They’re very cool!
Learn more.

Looking for a challenge? Next time you visit, see if you can find these tiny sanddabs hidden in the sand in the Sandy Seafloor gallery. We guarantee it will be worth the search. They’re very cool!

Learn more.

Can ocean animals be art? One look at these sailfin sculpin babies should answer that question! For the first time ever, we’ve raised these fish behind the scenes, and they’re now on exhibit in our Kelp Forest touchpool. Make your day better by having them as your computer wallpaper or Facebook cover image!  
Download a free wallpaper.

Can ocean animals be art? One look at these sailfin sculpin babies should answer that question! For the first time ever, we’ve raised these fish behind the scenes, and they’re now on exhibit in our Kelp Forest touchpool. Make your day better by having them as your computer wallpaper or Facebook cover image!  

Download a free wallpaper.

Our juvenile sailfin sculpins have put on their finery in anticipation of your visit. Will you be here for the #FourthofJuly? 

Plan your visit.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.