Showing posts tagged as "jellies"

Looking for aliens? Thanks to our partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), you can now find them in our Jellies Experience exhibition! As you can see, the large Aegina jelly in the center looks different than the others—and may be an undescribed species!Typically, Aegina found in Monterey Bay are lemon jellies (Aegina citrea), recognizable by their yellowish color and four tentacles. While this jelly’s reddish-purple hue may come from a brightly-colored meal, the six tentacles make it an unusual find! Genetic studies at MBARI suggest this is a distinct species—and research continues.Like many jellies, these animals can be fragile and short-lived, so we encourage you to visit soon and check them out!Learn more about our Jellies Experience exhibition

Looking for aliens? Thanks to our partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), you can now find them in our Jellies Experience exhibition! As you can see, the large Aegina jelly in the center looks different than the others—and may be an undescribed species!

Typically, Aegina found in Monterey Bay are lemon jellies (Aegina citrea), recognizable by their yellowish color and four tentacles. While this jelly’s reddish-purple hue may come from a brightly-colored meal, the six tentacles make it an unusual find! Genetic studies at MBARI suggest this is a distinct species—and research continues.

Like many jellies, these animals can be fragile and short-lived, so we encourage you to visit soon and check them out!

Learn more about our Jellies Experience exhibition

Got a case of the Mondays? Let our new flame jellies (Rhopilema esculentum) light your fire! This jelly’s golden and crimson tentacles flutter like flames as it swims, while its frilly fringe traps food. Learn more about our Jellies Experience exhibition

Got a case of the Mondays? Let our new flame jellies (Rhopilema esculentum) light your fire! This jelly’s golden and crimson tentacles flutter like flames as it swims, while its frilly fringe traps food.

Learn more about our Jellies Experience exhibition

Cannonball! Our newest additions to The Jellies Experience are making a splash. Cannonball jellies are fast swimmers—and a main source of food for endangered leatherback turtles. Learn more about this special exhibition

Cannonball! Our newest additions to The Jellies Experience are making a splash. Cannonball jellies are fast swimmers—and a main source of food for endangered leatherback turtles.

Learn more about this special exhibition

Outer space or under water? We partner with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on “blue-water” dives in Monterey Bay, and our jellies aquarist Wyatt Patry recently observed a bloom of salps (jelly relatives).  

Have you seen jellies? Help researchers by reporting sightings to JellyWatch

(Photos: Steve Haddock)

Have you seen these awesome thimble jellies (Linuche aquila) in the Jellies Experience? 

Sometimes we import our jellies, and sometimes, well, we get lucky: these were grown from polyps that our clever aquarists discovered on rocks in our tropical exhibits.

The medusae (bell) of thimble jellies grow and harvest algae, called zooxanthellae, for sustenance. That’s brown coloration you see in the photos. In nature, these jellies collect in bunches at the surface. Their polyps live in long chitonous tubes, which is very different from the typical fixed jellyfish polyp.

But beware: Thimble jellies are also responsible for “sea bathers eruption” in tropical climes, such as the Caribbean. When the jellies spawn and their larvae form, they get stuck in skin or bathing suits, with unpleasant results!

Learn more about the Jellies Experience

Fluorescent fireworks or otherworldly hovercraft? Flower hat jellies defy definition. This nocturnal species drifts in the dark and attaches to the seafloor as the sun shines. Their dazzling bells attract curious fish, while curly tentacles ensnare prey. Thanks to Instagrammer @sandman617 for this vivid video!

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Going somewhere? Juvenile cancer crabs hitch rides on sea nettles, dropping off as jellies get closer to shore. It’s the beach or bust for these travelers! Thanks to Instagrammer @reesies87 for this fun video!

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How do you grow a jelly? Our clever aquarists have figured it out. We were the first ones ever to display these surreal South American sea nettles after growing them behind the scenes from tiny ephyrae (babies), received from a lab in Argentina. On exhibit in the Jellies Experience! Learn more about the Jellies Experience

How do you grow a jelly? Our clever aquarists have figured it out. We were the first ones ever to display these surreal South American sea nettles after growing them behind the scenes from tiny ephyrae (babies), received from a lab in Argentina. On exhibit in the Jellies Experience!

Learn more about the Jellies Experience


#ThrowbackThursday: A Ferris wheel for jellies? Over the last 30 years we’ve displayed dozens of delicate jelly species. Special tanks—called kreisels—create circular currents to keep jellies afloat and away from walls. Help us innovate and inspire for another 30 years

#ThrowbackThursday: A Ferris wheel for jellies? Over the last 30 years we’ve displayed dozens of delicate jelly species. Special tanks—called kreisels—create circular currents to keep jellies afloat and away from walls.

Help us innovate and inspire for another 30 years

Sun seeker? During the day, the spotted jelly travels upward, orienting itself for maximum sun exposure.  It’s also known as a “lagoon jelly” because it lives in bays, harbors and lagoons in the South Pacific. But you don’t need to go that far—they’re on exhibit now in the Jellies Experience! Learn more about the spotted jelly Learn more about the Jellies Experience (Staci Vriese)

Sun seeker? During the day, the spotted jelly travels upward, orienting itself for maximum sun exposure.  It’s also known as a “lagoon jelly” because it lives in bays, harbors and lagoons in the South Pacific. But you don’t need to go that far—they’re on exhibit now in the Jellies Experience!

Learn more about the spotted jelly 

Learn more about the Jellies Experience

(Staci Vriese)

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.