Showing posts tagged as "julie packard"

Jack Johnson Sings Praises of the Aquarium as He Receives Paul Walker Ocean Leadership Award

"It’s a full circle. Every time I come to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, I’m inspired to write songs." - Jack Johnson

In an evening of words and music, singer-songwriter, philanthropist and ocean advocate Jack Johnson received the Paul Walker Ocean Leadership Award at our 30th Anniversary Celebration of the Ocean.

Jack paid tribute both to the Aquarium and to actor Paul Walker, in whose memory the award was created. Paul’s brothers, Cody and Caleb, were in attendance.

Executive Director Julie Packard saluted Jack and Paul for using their voices to encourage others to create a world with healthy oceans.

"Paul was an aspiring marine biologist," Julie said. "He was a friend of the Aquarium, and a lifelong champion of the ocean. And I can think of no one better to receive this award in his name than Jack Johnson."

Making a difference in the world

The ocean, Julie said, “is part of his life, and his music. He and his wife Kim have used that connection to make a difference in the world. They’re leading the music industry in green practices and using their success on behalf of many social and environmental issues.”

Among the initiatives their foundation supports is the Aquarium’s annual Ocean Plastic Pollution Summit that helps teachers find new ways to engage their students around the issue of plastic pollution and ocean health.

"It’s a high-impact experience for the kids and teachers, who take what they’ve learned back to their peers and communities," Julie said. "We’re so grateful for Jack and Kim’s support."

'One of the honors of my life'

For his part, Jack said, “It is one of the honors of my life to be acknowledged by the Monterey Bay Aquarium. It’s a very inspirational place. Whenever I bring my kids here, we have the best day, and we go away wanting to learn more about everything we’ve seen that day. 

"So, keep up all of the great work."

Of Paul Walker, he said, “I loved that guy. It’s an honor to be getting an award in his name.”

The celebration included some of Jack’s songs, a reception featuring Hawaiian music and dance, and dishes created in the aloha spirit by Seafood Watch Chef Ambassador Ed Kenney, a friend of Jack’s from Oahu.

All proceeds from the evening benefit our Children’s Education Fund.

We are so grateful to Jack and Kim Johnson for all that they do, and to the Paul Walker family for partnering with us to recognize individuals who — like Paul — are using their public stature in support of ocean issues.

Learn how you can support our Children’s Education Fund

It’s #ThrowbackThursday! This Fall 1980 edition of our newsletter featured elegant algae of Monterey Bay, drawn by seaweed scientist, Aquarium founder and Executive Director Julie Packard. Learn more about giant kelp—the inspiration for our logo!

It’s #ThrowbackThursday! This Fall 1980 edition of our newsletter featured elegant algae of Monterey Bay, drawn by seaweed scientist, Aquarium founder and Executive Director Julie Packard.

Learn more about giant kelp—the inspiration for our logo!

Marisa Miller, Jack Johnson to Receive Inaugural Paul Walker Ocean Leadership Award

The public knew Paul Walker best for his roles as an actor. We knew him as an aspiring marine biologist and a lifelong friend of the ocean

In collaboration with his family, we’ll honor his memory and continue his legacy through the Paul Walker Ocean Leadership Award – recognizing individuals who are using their public stature to advance ocean causes and support philanthropic ventures.

Our first recipients – actress and supermodel Marisa Miller, and singer Jack Johnson – will receive their awards in June.

Marisa Miller will be honored in a public presentation on Saturday, June 7 during our World Oceans Day weekend celebration. Jack Johnson will receive his award on Saturday, June 14 during a special 30th anniversary event supporting our Children’s Education Fund. 

Paul Walker’s daughter and brothers will participate in the presentations.

Both events are open to the public: World Oceans Day to all Aquarium visitors; the 30th anniversary evening event to ticket-holders.

Two ocean advocates

“The ocean plays a central role in the lives of both Marisa Miller and Jack Johnson – as it did for Paul Walker,” Executive Director Julie Packard said. “Like Paul, they recognize how important it is to work for a future with healthy oceans, and to inspire others to do their part. We’re proud to honor them in this way.”

Walker helped us celebrate World Oceans Day in 2005, and told visitors that day about about his personal commitment to ocean conservation – urging them to step up their own involvement.

“I was fortunate to have visited the Monterey Bay Aquarium with my father on several occasions,” said his daughter, Meadow Walker. “It held a special place in his heart, as it now does in mine. I am proud of him, and this award that honors his commitment to ocean conservation.”

Marisa Miller: actress, supermodel, surfer and mom

Marisa Miller is an actress, supermodel, a surfer and Monterey Bay area resident who has been inspired by the Aquarium’s work since she was a schoolgirl. Today, as a young mother, she actively promotes an ocean-friendly lifestyle – one that eliminates single-use plastic water bottles, and incorporates sustainable seafood choices, as well as organic foods and natural personal care products that keep pollutants out of the ocean. In addition to her philanthropic work with the American Cancer Society and the USO, she has been associated with Surfrider Foundation, which works on behalf of healthy oceans.

“I’m honored to be receiving the Paul Walker Ocean Leadership Award,” Marisa said. “The Monterey Bay Aquarium has been a part of my life since I was six years old. Its programs for education and ocean awareness are still impacting me today. I look forward to celebrating World Oceans Day with the communities that support all the work that the Monterey Bay Aquarium does.”

Jack Johnson: Singer-songwriter and philanthropist

Jack Johnson is an acclaimed singer-songwriter, surfer and filmmaker. The Hawaii native and his wife, Kim, have been effecting change worldwide by leading the music industry in greening practices and using their success to support many social and environmental issues. Their Johnson Ohana Charitable Foundation supports environmental initiatives, art and music education worldwide – including the Aquarium’s Ocean Plastic Pollution Summit, where teachers find new ways to engage their students around the issue of plastics and ocean health. A graduate of the University of California-Santa Barbara, Johnson has released multiple platinum-selling albums on Brushfire Records, including Brushfire Fairytales, Sleep Through the Static and To the Sea.

“The Monterey Bay Aquarium is a special place for our family,” Jack said. “I appreciate the energy they put into educating the public on sustainable seafood, marine debris, and the overall health of our oceans. I’m honored to be working with them and to be receiving the Paul Walker Award.”

Youth award recipient

At the World Oceans Day celebration, we’ll also present a youth award to 17-year-old high school student Ailis Dooner of Carmel, who took second in the world at the International Science Fair for researching a way to prevent lung cancer using substances found in sea anemones and seaweed. Ailis is one of our Teen Conservation Leaders.

Photos: Marisa Miller by David Gruber. Jack Johnson by Emmett Malloy. Paul Walker by Randy Wilder.

Shaping the Future for Healthy Oceans: Together, We Can
Aquarium Executive Director Julie Packard was the opening keynote speaker for the World Ocean Summit convened in Half Moon Bay, Calif. by The Economist and hosted in association with National Geographic. The summit brings together leaders from business, government, academia and the nonprofit world to talk about ways to reconcile economic development and ocean conservation, and to shape debate about future governance of the ocean.
Julie’s remarks, and those of former Aquarium trustee Leon Panetta, delivered a powerful and inspiring call to action as the three-day conference begins. Here’s what she had to say:
Welcome everyone and thank you for making the journey to the coast of California for the important work of the next few days. 
I grew up just a few miles away, over the mountains, in what’s today known as Silicon Valley. I’m just one of many who have drawn inspiration and energy from this very special piece of ocean along our coast. For the past 30 years, along with my involvement as a trustee of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, it’s been my privilege to direct the Monterey Bay Aquarium – where we’ve introduced over 50 million people to the incredible ocean life just off our coast. 
This evening we stand on the shores of a vast ocean system whose health will determine the future prosperity of the human species, and our very survival. Right now we are, both literally and figuratively, on the edge. The collective action of everyone in this room – whatever we decide to do – will shape the future for humanity on this planet. 
 The oceans: Key to our our survival
By being here, I am assuming that each of you already understands the critical role the oceans play in enabling life on Earth to exist. They make the oxygen we breathe and buffer us from the impacts of rising greenhouse gases and global temperatures. They serve up protein for millions of families and children. They’re our pantry, our lungs, our playground, and a massive driver of global commerce. And, they’re a source of inspiration and innovation for technologies that will sustain us into the future. 
This stretch of coast where we stand has inspired generations of ocean leaders, from scientists to policy makers, from technology innovators to ocean advocates. The shores of Monterey Bay are home to two dozen public and private research institutions that are using new technology – and new thinking – to understand the living ocean and inform a course for the future.
The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, founded by my father 25 years ago, is a pioneer in developing new technology to accelerate our understanding of the rapidly changing ocean and the role of human impact in that change.  Other institutions here are focusing on understanding changing ocean chemistry and food webs, documenting the epic migrations of tunas to inform fisheries management, and analyzing weather systems that affect everything from shipping safety and national security to rainfall patterns on our farmlands.
California is leading the way
Indeed, Monterey Bay is one of most studied pieces of ocean on the planet. And in turn, California has demonstrated huge leadership in environmental policy, from legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions to the largest marine protected area network in the United States. And yet, the more we learn, the more complexity the ocean reveals to us. We’re scrambling for predictability and solutions in an era of escalating change. 
It’s fantastic to see so many great thinkers gathered to talk about the ocean. Based on my long term experience as a trustee of the Packard Foundation, I can tell you that 30 years ago, few funders and nonprofits were focused on ocean issues. Today, it’s gratifying to see growing attention to the ocean – after all, it is Earth’s largest natural system.
The work of government, nonprofits and learning institutions has driven much of this progress, fueled with a lot of help from private funders and leaders who care. But there’s still a missing factor that’s not fully engaged, and it’s one that I believe is the critical key to reversing the trajectory we’re on – and that factor is business leadership.
A vital role for business
That’s where you all come in. In recent years, new ocean initiatives are focusing on partnerships among business, government and nongovernmental organization players. These initiatives are yielding promising results, but collectively we can and must do more.
The 2012 Economist Ocean Summit concluded that the health of the oceans must be included in Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives. It’s a long-overdue and welcome idea – because business leadership has so much to contribute to solving the challenges we face.  
The Monterey Bay Aquarium itself is a product of a transformational collaboration between technology business leaders and conservation scientists. Today, the Aquarium hosts nearly 2 million people a year. It’s an anchor for a thriving tourism economy, in turn supporting conservation science and building a constituency for the oceans.
Success for Seafood Watch
The Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program, now in its 15th year, is an example of how successful business partnerships can improve the health of the oceans, and the well-being of people worldwide – blending science, market data, and technology to generate environmental, social, and economic benefits.
Today, more than 100,000 business locations in North America rely on Seafood Watch science to inform their purchasing practices. We have partnerships with the two largest food service companies on the continent – Compass Group and ARAMARK – along with global food products companies like Mars. They all have made firm commitments to shift their seafood purchases to sustainable sources, and they’re reaping market benefits as a result.
In 1996, with support from the Packard Foundation and other funders, Unilever and World Wildlife Fund partnered to create the Marine Stewardship Council, to change the way fish are caught, marketed and purchased. Why? Because Unilever knew that if nothing changed, it would run out of fish to sell. Staying in business is a powerful driver. And, this collaboration will help assure global food security.
Sustainable seafood commitments are growing
Today, global retailers who have made sustainable seafood commitments represent 76 percent of the market, with more than $22 billion in estimated seafood sales. In North America, retailers with seafood commitments represent 97 percent of market share among the top 25 retailers. Similar commitments are growing among companies worldwide.
For enduring change, governments must be central players, and when governments make a commitment to protect and restore ocean resources, they are seeing strong results. At the Packard Foundation, we’re working with partners around the world to strengthen fisheries and coastal management – especially in regions where marine productivity or biodiversity are threatened. As one example: In Indonesia, WWF and The Nature Conservancy are working with private sector seafood buyers, USAID, local fishers and government agencies to collect hard-to-gather fisheries data to inform more effective management.
This work results in a triple bottom line: healthier fish populations & ecosystems, a higher standard of living for local communities, and a competitive edge in the global sustainable seafood marketplace.  
Investing in the oceans 
So why was technology leader David Packard willing to invest a considerable amount of his resources – financial and intellectual – into ocean science, education and conservation solutions through the Packard Foundation and its initiatives and institutions?  Why are Eric and Wendy Schmidt and other contemporary leaders contributing to transformational strategies for oceans now? Because of the power that technology, science and business thinking can bring to ocean management solutions.
Today, more than ever, business needs to drive the solutions, through new approaches and commitments that will ensure economic prosperity in a world of declining resources. In turn, the pioneers will prosper in a world where clients and customers increasingly measure businesses by a triple bottom line.
At the Packard Foundation and our family of ocean enterprises, we are continually inspired by the example of David and Lucile Packard, and by their values. These values – to innovate, to take risks and be willing to adjust course, and to invest in people – have served us well. We have been proud to support the great ideas and hard work of many of you here in this room.
One vision: Improve people’s lives
When my father co-founded the Hewlett-Packard Company he put forward a statement of underlying principles that shaped business management practices for years to come. The main idea in those principles was that a company’s primary purpose should be to make a contribution that improves peoples’ lives. It was a radical idea at the time. 
But I would venture to say that everyone in this room, from business leader to environmental advocate, shares that goal: to improve peoples’ lives. To achieve it, in today’s new reality of rapid environmental change, we must push beyond business as usual. And we must do it soon. 
Business leaders have a compelling opportunity – and I believe an imperative — to lead success, through your resources, relationships, intellectual talent and corporate policies. There is no shortage of great ideas and opportunity before us, so let’s get to it.
I look forward to the outcome of this gathering and thank you all again for your commitment to the future of the ocean.  

Photos: Julie Packard © Motofumi Tai; sea otters © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Tyson Rininger; coral reef © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Charles Seaborn

Shaping the Future for Healthy Oceans: Together, We Can

Aquarium Executive Director Julie Packard was the opening keynote speaker for the World Ocean Summit convened in Half Moon Bay, Calif. by The Economist and hosted in association with National Geographic. The summit brings together leaders from business, government, academia and the nonprofit world to talk about ways to reconcile economic development and ocean conservation, and to shape debate about future governance of the ocean.

Julie’s remarks, and those of former Aquarium trustee Leon Panetta, delivered a powerful and inspiring call to action as the three-day conference begins. Here’s what she had to say:

Welcome everyone and thank you for making the journey to the coast of California for the important work of the next few days. 

I grew up just a few miles away, over the mountains, in what’s today known as Silicon Valley. I’m just one of many who have drawn inspiration and energy from this very special piece of ocean along our coast. For the past 30 years, along with my involvement as a trustee of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, it’s been my privilege to direct the Monterey Bay Aquarium – where we’ve introduced over 50 million people to the incredible ocean life just off our coast. 

This evening we stand on the shores of a vast ocean system whose health will determine the future prosperity of the human species, and our very survival. Right now we are, both literally and figuratively, on the edge. The collective action of everyone in this room – whatever we decide to do  will shape the future for humanity on this planet.

 The oceans: Key to our our survival

By being here, I am assuming that each of you already understands the critical role the oceans play in enabling life on Earth to exist. They make the oxygen we breathe and buffer us from the impacts of rising greenhouse gases and global temperatures. They serve up protein for millions of families and children. They’re our pantry, our lungs, our playground, and a massive driver of global commerce. And, they’re a source of inspiration and innovation for technologies that will sustain us into the future.

This stretch of coast where we stand has inspired generations of ocean leaders, from scientists to policy makers, from technology innovators to ocean advocates. The shores of Monterey Bay are home to two dozen public and private research institutions that are using new technology – and new thinking – to understand the living ocean and inform a course for the future.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, founded by my father 25 years ago, is a pioneer in developing new technology to accelerate our understanding of the rapidly changing ocean and the role of human impact in that change.  Other institutions here are focusing on understanding changing ocean chemistry and food webs, documenting the epic migrations of tunas to inform fisheries management, and analyzing weather systems that affect everything from shipping safety and national security to rainfall patterns on our farmlands.

California is leading the way

Indeed, Monterey Bay is one of most studied pieces of ocean on the planet. And in turn, California has demonstrated huge leadership in environmental policy, from legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions to the largest marine protected area network in the United States. And yet, the more we learn, the more complexity the ocean reveals to us. We’re scrambling for predictability and solutions in an era of escalating change. 

It’s fantastic to see so many great thinkers gathered to talk about the ocean. Based on my long term experience as a trustee of the Packard Foundation, I can tell you that 30 years ago, few funders and nonprofits were focused on ocean issues. Today, it’s gratifying to see growing attention to the ocean – after all, it is Earth’s largest natural system.

The work of government, nonprofits and learning institutions has driven much of this progress, fueled with a lot of help from private funders and leaders who care. But there’s still a missing factor that’s not fully engaged, and it’s one that I believe is the critical key to reversing the trajectory we’re on – and that factor is business leadership.

A vital role for business

That’s where you all come in. In recent years, new ocean initiatives are focusing on partnerships among business, government and nongovernmental organization players. These initiatives are yielding promising results, but collectively we can and must do more.

The 2012 Economist Ocean Summit concluded that the health of the oceans must be included in Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives. It’s a long-overdue and welcome idea – because business leadership has so much to contribute to solving the challenges we face.  

The Monterey Bay Aquarium itself is a product of a transformational collaboration between technology business leaders and conservation scientists. Today, the Aquarium hosts nearly 2 million people a year. It’s an anchor for a thriving tourism economy, in turn supporting conservation science and building a constituency for the oceans.

Success for Seafood Watch

The Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program, now in its 15th year, is an example of how successful business partnerships can improve the health of the oceans, and the well-being of people worldwide – blending science, market data, and technology to generate environmental, social, and economic benefits.

Today, more than 100,000 business locations in North America rely on Seafood Watch science to inform their purchasing practices. We have partnerships with the two largest food service companies on the continent – Compass Group and ARAMARK – along with global food products companies like Mars. They all have made firm commitments to shift their seafood purchases to sustainable sources, and they’re reaping market benefits as a result.

In 1996, with support from the Packard Foundation and other funders, Unilever and World Wildlife Fund partnered to create the Marine Stewardship Council, to change the way fish are caught, marketed and purchased. Why? Because Unilever knew that if nothing changed, it would run out of fish to sell. Staying in business is a powerful driver. And, this collaboration will help assure global food security.

Sustainable seafood commitments are growing

Today, global retailers who have made sustainable seafood commitments represent 76 percent of the market, with more than $22 billion in estimated seafood sales. In North America, retailers with seafood commitments represent 97 percent of market share among the top 25 retailers. Similar commitments are growing among companies worldwide.

For enduring change, governments must be central players, and when governments make a commitment to protect and restore ocean resources, they are seeing strong results. At the Packard Foundation, we’re working with partners around the world to strengthen fisheries and coastal management – especially in regions where marine productivity or biodiversity are threatened. As one example: In Indonesia, WWF and The Nature Conservancy are working with private sector seafood buyers, USAID, local fishers and government agencies to collect hard-to-gather fisheries data to inform more effective management.

This work results in a triple bottom line: healthier fish populations & ecosystems, a higher standard of living for local communities, and a competitive edge in the global sustainable seafood marketplace.  

Investing in the oceans 

So why was technology leader David Packard willing to invest a considerable amount of his resources – financial and intellectual – into ocean science, education and conservation solutions through the Packard Foundation and its initiatives and institutions?  Why are Eric and Wendy Schmidt and other contemporary leaders contributing to transformational strategies for oceans now? Because of the power that technology, science and business thinking can bring to ocean management solutions.

Today, more than ever, business needs to drive the solutions, through new approaches and commitments that will ensure economic prosperity in a world of declining resources. In turn, the pioneers will prosper in a world where clients and customers increasingly measure businesses by a triple bottom line.

At the Packard Foundation and our family of ocean enterprises, we are continually inspired by the example of David and Lucile Packard, and by their values. These values – to innovate, to take risks and be willing to adjust course, and to invest in people – have served us well. We have been proud to support the great ideas and hard work of many of you here in this room.

One vision: Improve people’s lives

When my father co-founded the Hewlett-Packard Company he put forward a statement of underlying principles that shaped business management practices for years to come. The main idea in those principles was that a company’s primary purpose should be to make a contribution that improves peoples’ lives. It was a radical idea at the time.

But I would venture to say that everyone in this room, from business leader to environmental advocate, shares that goal: to improve peoples’ lives. To achieve it, in today’s new reality of rapid environmental change, we must push beyond business as usual. And we must do it soon.

Business leaders have a compelling opportunity – and I believe an imperative — to lead success, through your resources, relationships, intellectual talent and corporate policies. There is no shortage of great ideas and opportunity before us, so let’s get to it.

I look forward to the outcome of this gathering and thank you all again for your commitment to the future of the ocean.  

Photos: Julie Packard © Motofumi Tai; sea otters © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Tyson Rininger; coral reef © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Charles Seaborn

Can volunteering at the Aquarium help keep you young? Amazing 94-year-old Paul Croonquist receives 8,000-hour award from Executive Director Julie Packard, in the company of his daughters and wife Phoebe. Thank you Paul, and all our volunteers. We couldn’t do it without you!

Learn more about volunteering

It’s a  Celebration of California’s Ocean! Enjoy an extraordinary evening of great food, wine and cooking demos featuring some of the West Coast’s most admired celebrity chefs and wineries at the Allied Arts Guild in Menlo Park California, Sept. 14. You’ll also meet Executive Director Julie Packard and learn about our work to protect the oceans and ocean wildlife! 
Learn more.

It’s a  Celebration of California’s Ocean! Enjoy an extraordinary evening of great food, wine and cooking demos featuring some of the West Coast’s most admired celebrity chefs and wineries at the Allied Arts Guild in Menlo Park California, Sept. 14. You’ll also meet Executive Director Julie Packard and learn about our work to protect the oceans and ocean wildlife! 

Learn more.

Prince Albert II of Monaco, a longtime ocean advocate, visited the Aquarium in late September as part of the local BLUE Ocean Film Festival and Ocean in a High CO2 World Symposium.  While here he took a special behind-the-scenes tour with Executive Director Julie Packard and  Dr. Jane Lubchenco of NOAA. We were honored to have him! 

Julie Packard named to “50 Most Powerful Food People for 2012”
Executive Director Julie Packard has been named one of “America’s 50 Most Powerful People in Food for 2012” by the influential website The Daily Meal, because of the impact our Seafood Watch program is having on demand for sustainable seafood. Julie ranks No. 20 on the list –- behind Food Network President Brooke Johnston (No. 1), Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack (No. 2), First Lady Michelle Obama (No. 8), Chef Wolfgang Puck (No. 13) and the CEOs of Walmart, McDonalds, Monsanto, PepsiCo and Kraft. “Our ultimate criterion was simply this,” wrote Daily Meal editor and Saveur magazine founder Colman Andrews. “Is each person on our list capable, whether by dint of corporate station, media access, moral authority, or sheer personality, of substantially changing, improving, and/or degrading the quality and variety of the American diet or the way we think about it? If so, how absolute is the power he or she can bring to bear?” In evaluating Julie’s influence, the editors concluded that because of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s pioneering efforts in the sustainable seafood movement, “Chefs and responsible consumers all over the country now consult its Seafood Watch list (in the form of wallet cards, a web site, and an app) of sustainable choices in fish and shellfish, thus impacting the seafood marketplace from coast to coast.”“It’s an honor to be included on this list, and a testament to the impact we want to have in transforming the way seafood is caught and farmed,” Julie said. “From the beginning, we’ve used the best available science as a way to help consumers, chefs and large businesses use their purchasing power to assure a future with healthy oceans.”Since 1999, we’ve distributed 40 million Seafood Watch consumer pocket guides –- six regional guides, a national guide, a guide to sushi and two Spanish-language guides –- to help individuals make ocean-friendly seafood choices. Our iPhone and Android Seafood Watch apps have been downloaded nearly 900,000 times. The apps also let users map and share the locations of restaurants and retailers where they find sustainable seafood items.The Seafood Watch science program is the basis for recommendations created by many sustainable seafood programs in North America. Seafood Watch partners directly with the two largest food service companies in North America –- ARAMARK and Compass Group –- to help them shift millions of pounds of seafood purchases annually in more sustainable directions. Seafood Watch recommendations are used to guide wild-caught seafood choices at Whole Foods Market, which has committed to eliminating all red-list Avoid seafood no later than Earth Day 2013.Seafood Watch partners with nearly 200 aquariums, zoos, science centers and public agencies nationwide to spread the word about the connection between consumer seafood choices and the health of the oceans.We also work closely with noted chefs and culinary celebrities, and each year at our Cooking for Solutions culinary celebration we honor more than a dozen who are leaders in the movement to make sustainable foods –- including sustainable seafood –- the national norm.

Julie Packard named to “50 Most Powerful Food People for 2012”

Executive Director Julie Packard has been named one of “America’s 50 Most Powerful People in Food for 2012” by the influential website The Daily Meal, because of the impact our Seafood Watch program is having on demand for sustainable seafood.

Julie ranks No. 20 on the list –- behind Food Network President Brooke Johnston (No. 1), Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack (No. 2), First Lady Michelle Obama (No. 8), Chef Wolfgang Puck (No. 13) and the CEOs of Walmart, McDonalds, Monsanto, PepsiCo and Kraft.

“Our ultimate criterion was simply this,” wrote Daily Meal editor and Saveur magazine founder Colman Andrews. “Is each person on our list capable, whether by dint of corporate station, media access, moral authority, or sheer personality, of substantially changing, improving, and/or degrading the quality and variety of the American diet or the way we think about it? If so, how absolute is the power he or she can bring to bear?”

In evaluating Julie’s influence, the editors concluded that because of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s pioneering efforts in the sustainable seafood movement, “Chefs and responsible consumers all over the country now consult its Seafood Watch list (in the form of wallet cards, a web site, and an app) of sustainable choices in fish and shellfish, thus impacting the seafood marketplace from coast to coast.”

“It’s an honor to be included on this list, and a testament to the impact we want to have in transforming the way seafood is caught and farmed,” Julie said. “From the beginning, we’ve used the best available science as a way to help consumers, chefs and large businesses use their purchasing power to assure a future with healthy oceans.”

Since 1999, we’ve distributed 40 million Seafood Watch consumer pocket guides –- six regional guides, a national guide, a guide to sushi and two Spanish-language guides –- to help individuals make ocean-friendly seafood choices. Our iPhone and Android Seafood Watch apps have been downloaded nearly 900,000 times. The apps also let users map and share the locations of restaurants and retailers where they find sustainable seafood items.

The Seafood Watch science program is the basis for recommendations created by many sustainable seafood programs in North America. Seafood Watch partners directly with the two largest food service companies in North America –- ARAMARK and Compass Group –- to help them shift millions of pounds of seafood purchases annually in more sustainable directions. Seafood Watch recommendations are used to guide wild-caught seafood choices at Whole Foods Market, which has committed to eliminating all red-list Avoid seafood no later than Earth Day 2013.

Seafood Watch partners with nearly 200 aquariums, zoos, science centers and public agencies nationwide to spread the word about the connection between consumer seafood choices and the health of the oceans.

We also work closely with noted chefs and culinary celebrities, and each year at our Cooking for Solutions culinary celebration we honor more than a dozen who are leaders in the movement to make sustainable foods –- including sustainable seafood –- the national norm.


On January 24 we celebrated a remarkable milestone: the Aquarium has hosted 2 million students as part of our free education programs! Executive Director Julie Packard honored four schools who have participated in free school days for the last seven consecutive years. Check out photos from the big event!

On January 24 we celebrate a remarkable milestone: the Aquarium will have hosted 2 million students taking part in free education programs! As part of the celebration, Executive Director Julie Packard will be honoring four schools who have participated in free school days for the last seven consecutive years. 

On January 24 we celebrate a remarkable milestone: the Aquarium will have hosted 2 million students taking part in free education programs! As part of the celebration, Executive Director Julie Packard will be honoring four schools who have participated in free school days for the last seven consecutive years. 

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.