Showing posts tagged as "monterey bay aquarium"

Going somewhere? Juvenile cancer crabs hitch rides on sea nettles, dropping off as jellies get closer to shore. It’s the beach or bust for these travelers! Thanks to Instagrammer @reesies87 for this fun video!

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Mola memories? Sea anemone selfies? We love to see your favorite Aquarium photos! Use the hashtags #MontereyBayAquarium and #FanFriday on Instagram—we’ll highlight some of the best each week. 

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It’s a sea otter celebration! Thanks to you, the California State Sea Otter Fund met its target this year, and will be on tax forms again in 2015. Kudos for checking the box in support of sea otter research on your California State tax form!Learn more  (Jim Capwell/www.divecentral.com)

It’s a sea otter celebration! Thanks to you, the California State Sea Otter Fund met its target this year, and will be on tax forms again in 2015. Kudos for checking the box in support of sea otter research on your California State tax form!

Learn more

 (Jim Capwell/www.divecentral.com)

Caution: orca crossing! We’ve been seeing a lot of whales and dolphins in the bay this summer, but this #ThrowbackThursday photo from 1984 features the only orca ever seen on Cannery Row! This full-size model now greets guests in our main entrance. Plan your visit

Caution: orca crossing! We’ve been seeing a lot of whales and dolphins in the bay this summer, but this #ThrowbackThursday photo from 1984 features the only orca ever seen on Cannery Row! This full-size model now greets guests in our main entrance.

Plan your visit

How do you grow a jelly? Our clever aquarists have figured it out. We were the first ones ever to display these surreal South American sea nettles after growing them behind the scenes from tiny ephyrae (babies), received from a lab in Argentina. On exhibit in the Jellies Experience! Learn more about the Jellies Experience

How do you grow a jelly? Our clever aquarists have figured it out. We were the first ones ever to display these surreal South American sea nettles after growing them behind the scenes from tiny ephyrae (babies), received from a lab in Argentina. On exhibit in the Jellies Experience!

Learn more about the Jellies Experience


Planning your Labor Day getaway to the Aquarium? Our free mobile app helps you dive in! Find your favorite programs and feeding shows, learn fun animal facts, and share postcards with friends and family. Download now

Planning your Labor Day getaway to the Aquarium? Our free mobile app helps you dive in! Find your favorite programs and feeding shows, learn fun animal facts, and share postcards with friends and family.

Download now

Did you know that the giant clam is the largest clam in the world? Ours was put on display in 2007, when it was a mere eight inches. Now it’s 2.5 feet! And who knew that a clam could be so colorful? The giant clam (Tridacna gigas) can weigh as much as 440 pounds, grow up to four feet, and live to 100 years or more. And all that on a diet of…sunlight! The giant clam gets most of its nourishment through photosynthesis. Tiny algae called zooxanthellae live in its tissues and convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates. Learn more

Did you know that the giant clam is the largest clam in the world? Ours was put on display in 2007, when it was a mere eight inches. Now it’s 2.5 feet! And who knew that a clam could be so colorful?

The giant clam (Tridacna gigas) can weigh as much as 440 pounds, grow up to four feet, and live to 100 years or more. And all that on a diet of…sunlight! The giant clam gets most of its nourishment through photosynthesis. Tiny algae called zooxanthellae live in its tissues and convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates. 

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Life’s a breach! Humpback whales are still in the bay feeding on massive schools of anchovies—and we have the best seats in the house. These graceful giants have been breaching, spouting and feeding just off our decks! Go whale watching from home with our free computer or mobile wallpaper 

Life’s a breach! Humpback whales are still in the bay feeding on massive schools of anchovies—and we have the best seats in the house. These graceful giants have been breaching, spouting and feeding just off our decks!

Go whale watching from home with our free computer or mobile wallpaper 

Hop on down! The red-legged frog just became California’s official state amphibian—and you can see one at the Aquarium. This local leaper was even featured in Mark Twain’s famous story, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.” Learn more about this threatened species

Hop on down! The red-legged frog just became California’s official state amphibian—and you can see one at the Aquarium. This local leaper was even featured in Mark Twain’s famous story, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.”

Learn more about this threatened species

What lurks in the darkness of Monterey Bay? To predators, the rosy rockfish’s neon colors appear gray because red light doesn’t reach the deep reef. Thanks to staffer Patrick Webster for this dive footage from 90 feet!

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About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.