Showing posts tagged as "monterey bay aquarium"

Did you know the Aquarium has been helping save sea otters for 30 years? More than 600 have come through our sea otter program, and many have been raised by exhibit otters serving as surrogate moms. They are released to the wild or find homes at other aquariums, where they inspire millions of people to care about—and care for—sea otters.

Learn more

#SeaOtterWeek

Need a creative boost? Just download our free wallpaper! This early concept drawing of our galleries was sketched by Gene Takeshita in the 1970s, well before we opened in 1984. Today, the Aquarium houses nearly 200 exhibits—windows to the wonders of the ocean! Choose your computer or mobile wallpaper

Need a creative boost? Just download our free wallpaper! This early concept drawing of our galleries was sketched by Gene Takeshita in the 1970s, well before we opened in 1984. Today, the Aquarium houses nearly 200 exhibits—windows to the wonders of the ocean! 

Choose your computer or mobile wallpaper

Are sea otters slowly swimming toward recovery? We hope so! A recent census counted  2,944, a small bump from the 2013 report of 2,939. We can’t think of a better way to launch  #SeaOtterWeek! Learn more about the census, and how the  Aquarium and partners are working to save sea otters—with your help. (Jim Capwell/Divecentral.com) 

Are sea otters slowly swimming toward recovery? We hope so! A recent census counted  2,944, a small bump from the 2013 report of 2,939. We can’t think of a better way to launch  #SeaOtterWeek!

Learn more about the census, and how the  Aquarium and partners are working to save sea otters—with your help.

(Jim Capwell/Divecentral.com) 

Some appetite! Our recently hatched common murre chicks are behind the scenes eating (and eating, and eating) in preparation for going on exhibit. It’s the first time we’ve ever had baby murres at the Aquarium!
The eggs, from different mothers, were taken behind the scenes and incubated by our aviculture staff. They hatched August 29 and 30. We take them behind the scenes for their health and safety, rather than keep them in a busy exhibit environment.
The chicks’ mothers have been with us for many years. One was rescued from the Apex Houston oil spill, which occurred off the northern California coast in January 1986. (In fact, at least one Aquarium employee, Janet Covell, was on the scene helping rescue murres.) Our pair was declared non-releasable by California Fish and Wildlife, and was raised at the Aquarium.
Although the species is not currently listed as threatened, all shorebirds face pressures from habitat damage and pollution. The chicks are being raised at the Aquarium under the auspices of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan (SSP). 
The youngsters are growing fast and being hand-fed small fish every few hours, from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. It’s a lot of work! We expect them to be big enough to go on exhibit in in mid October.
 “We’re really excited to have these chicks at the Aquarium,” says Aimee Greenebaum, associate curator of aviculture. “Especially since they were born to rescued mothers that have been here for a long time. It’s a great success story. Plus—they’re so cute!”
Learn more about the common murre

 

Some appetite! Our recently hatched common murre chicks are behind the scenes eating (and eating, and eating) in preparation for going on exhibit. It’s the first time we’ve ever had baby murres at the Aquarium!

The eggs, from different mothers, were taken behind the scenes and incubated by our aviculture staff. They hatched August 29 and 30. We take them behind the scenes for their health and safety, rather than keep them in a busy exhibit environment.

The chicks’ mothers have been with us for many years. One was rescued from the Apex Houston oil spill, which occurred off the northern California coast in January 1986. (In fact, at least one Aquarium employee, Janet Covell, was on the scene helping rescue murres.) Our pair was declared non-releasable by California Fish and Wildlife, and was raised at the Aquarium.

Although the species is not currently listed as threatened, all shorebirds face pressures from habitat damage and pollution. The chicks are being raised at the Aquarium under the auspices of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan (SSP). 

The youngsters are growing fast and being hand-fed small fish every few hours, from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. It’s a lot of work! We expect them to be big enough to go on exhibit in in mid October.

 “We’re really excited to have these chicks at the Aquarium,” says Aimee Greenebaum, associate curator of aviculture. “Especially since they were born to rescued mothers that have been here for a long time. It’s a great success story. Plus—they’re so cute!”

Learn more about the common murre

 

Beaches, rivers or lakes! Wherever you are, you can help keep our oceans clean and healthy by celebrating Coastal Cleanup Day this Saturday. Find a location near you

Beaches, rivers or lakes! Wherever you are, you can help keep our oceans clean and healthy by celebrating Coastal Cleanup Day this Saturday.

Find a location near you

Happy Friday! Did you know that the Aquarium was built on the site of an old sardine cannery? In a sense, we’re still very much in the sardine business. We have thousands of these hypnotic fish, and they come to us through good relations with local fishermen. Watch them liveLearn why sardines are a Seafood Watch “Best Choice”

Happy Friday! Did you know that the Aquarium was built on the site of an old sardine cannery? In a sense, we’re still very much in the sardine business. We have thousands of these hypnotic fish, and they come to us through good relations with local fishermen.

Watch them live

Learn why sardines are a Seafood Watch “Best Choice”


Just another work day? Buckling into a harness, Aquarium founder Steve Webster was hoisted above the bay by a crane to snap this #ThrowbackThursday photo of our construction site. We’re celebrating 30 years in October—help us grow

Just another work day? Buckling into a harness, Aquarium founder Steve Webster was hoisted above the bay by a crane to snap this #ThrowbackThursday photo of our construction site.

We’re celebrating 30 years in October—help us grow

Did you hear? We’re celebrating Otter Days this weekend! Enjoy special programs and family crafts as you learn more about sea otters and how you can help them. Plan your visit

Did you hear? We’re celebrating Otter Days this weekend! Enjoy special programs and family crafts as you learn more about sea otters and how you can help them.

Plan your visit

Feeling trapped in your cubicle this #humpday? At least you’re not a bryozoan! This bizarre animal lives inside a tiny box-shaped chamber stuck to a blade of kelp, next to dozens of its kin. Learn more (Photo: Garry McCarthy)

Feeling trapped in your cubicle this #humpday? At least you’re not a bryozoan! This bizarre animal lives inside a tiny box-shaped chamber stuck to a blade of kelp, next to dozens of its kin.

Learn more

(Photo: Garry McCarthy)

This #WhaleWednesday, lunge for lunch! Humpback whales corral schools of anchovies with air bubbles and swim through them, mouths gaping. A single humpback can consume up to 3,000 lbs per day! Learn more(Photo: Efren B. Adalem)

This #WhaleWednesday, lunge for lunch! Humpback whales corral schools of anchovies with air bubbles and swim through them, mouths gaping. A single humpback can consume up to 3,000 lbs per day!

Learn more

(Photo: Efren B. Adalem)

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.