Showing posts tagged as "monterey bay Aquarium"

Swimming scallops? This sandy seafloor resident doesn’t stick around—it claps its two shells together and jets off to escape being a sea star’s meal. Try to spot them in our Monterey Bay Habitats gallery(Photo: Steve Johnston)

Swimming scallops? This sandy seafloor resident doesn’t stick around—it claps its two shells together and jets off to escape being a sea star’s meal.

Try to spot them in our Monterey Bay Habitats gallery

(Photo: Steve Johnston)

"You can point to anything here and I’ll tell you where it goes, and what it does. We’ve been called unsung heroes of the Aquarium. Most people up there have no idea what’s underneath them. I’ve always been interested in water. I’ve always loved the oceans. Water is my life. I wake up thinking about water.” —Wayne Sperduto, facility systems supervisor #MyAquariumStory

"You can point to anything here and I’ll tell you where it goes, and what it does. We’ve been called unsung heroes of the Aquarium. Most people up there have no idea what’s underneath them. I’ve always been interested in water. I’ve always loved the oceans. Water is my life. I wake up thinking about water.”

—Wayne Sperduto, facility systems supervisor

#MyAquariumStory

Have you visited our new, redesigned Seafood Watch website? Now it’s easier than ever to make choices for healthy oceans. It features new, faster search – and works great on your mobile device. Check it out

Have you visited our new, redesigned Seafood Watch website? Now it’s easier than ever to make choices for healthy oceans. It features new, faster search – and works great on your mobile device.

Check it out

Don’t let those floppy “ears” fool you! The California sea hare can release a slimy cloud of irritating purplish ink to confuse or distract hungry predators. Learn more about this sizable sea slug(Photo: Patrick Webster)

Don’t let those floppy “ears” fool you! The California sea hare can release a slimy cloud of irritating purplish ink to confuse or distract hungry predators.

Learn more about this sizable sea slug

(Photo: Patrick Webster)

Whales? Check. Dolphins? Check. Seals, sea lions and otters? Triple check! Monterey Bay is still teeming with marine mammals. On Friday, staff and guests spotted eight different species from our wildlife viewing station—in 30 minutes!

Learn more

(Top photo: Dan Albro, Bottom photos: Jim Capwell/Divecentral.com)

Have you seen these awesome thimble jellies (Linuche aquila) in the Jellies Experience? 

Sometimes we import our jellies, and sometimes, well, we get lucky: these were grown from polyps that our clever aquarists discovered on rocks in our tropical exhibits.

The medusae (bell) of thimble jellies grow and harvest algae, called zooxanthellae, for sustenance. That’s brown coloration you see in the photos. In nature, these jellies collect in bunches at the surface. Their polyps live in long chitonous tubes, which is very different from the typical fixed jellyfish polyp.

But beware: Thimble jellies are also responsible for “sea bathers eruption” in tropical climes, such as the Caribbean. When the jellies spawn and their larvae form, they get stuck in skin or bathing suits, with unpleasant results!

Learn more about the Jellies Experience

Happy #FanFriday! We’re all about offering a welcoming space for kids with different abilities to engage with the ocean. Recently Henry and Catherine, cephalopod super fans with autism, visited with their parents and shared their experience with us. 

“Henry is so inspired to grow up and be a cuttlefish scientist,” said mom Christine. “I really don’t have words for how important this visit was for him and how much it could actually influence his life in a truly meaningful, ongoing way.” 

Have you had an incredible Aquarium visit? Let us know on our Facebook page!

(Photos: Christine Rogers)

From sea otters to sunfish—we’d love to know: What would YOU like to see more of on our Tumblr page? Won’t you take a few seconds and tell us? Happy Friday!

What makes WATCH a winner? Our “Watsonville Area Teens Conserving Habitats” program recently won a Noyce Foundation “Bright Lights” award for outstanding community engagement. Our Executive Director Julie Packard tells why. 

Learn more

"My wife went on a four-month trip and left me with binoculars and a bird book. That’s how it all started. When you work with birds, you have to slow down. You have to think about everything—where you put your hands, what cues you give off. They’re so tuned in to body language.”
—Eric Miller, aviculturist#MyAquariumStory

"My wife went on a four-month trip and left me with binoculars and a bird book. That’s how it all started. When you work with birds, you have to slow down. You have to think about everything—where you put your hands, what cues you give off. They’re so tuned in to body language.”

—Eric Miller, aviculturist

#MyAquariumStory

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.