Showing posts tagged as "monterey bay aquarium"

What’s the best Aquarium in the U.S.? We’d love your support! You can vote once per day in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards.Vote now!

What’s the best Aquarium in the U.S.? We’d love your support! You can vote once per day in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards.

Vote now!

Raising awareness, one image at a time

We know that beautiful images can move people in profound ways to act on behalf of animals.

National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore is on a mission to inspire people to protect wild animals by taking studio portraits of their kin at zoos and aquariums for his Photo Ark project.

The stark black and white backgrounds equalize the animals’ importance, whether the largest elephant or the smallest insect.

"By isolating animals on black and white backgrounds, we can look them directly in the eye and quickly see that these creatures contain beauty, grace and intelligence. Perhaps some even hold the key to our very salvation," Joel says.

At the Aquarium

We had the honor of hosting Joel recently for two fun and frenetic days as he photographed birds, fish, cephalopods and invertebrates. Joel’s hardworking staff is busy processing thousands of images he shot here and elsewhere, but we’ll soon share more of ours — plus what it’s like to work with Joel, a dozen aquarists, two other photographers and 30 critters parading in and out of one room.

In the meantime please support Joel by liking his Facebook page. To date Joel has documented nearly 4,000 animals for the Photo Ark and won’t stop until he gets them all — and you can help!

Now THAT’S something you could wear with pride! This belt buckle was given to Rudolph and Sletten employees—the contractors who built the Aquarium—in 1983. We’re celebrating our 30th Anniversary every #ThrowbackThursday.Won’t you help us reach another 30 years?  

Now THAT’S something you could wear with pride! This belt buckle was given to Rudolph and Sletten employees—the contractors who built the Aquarium—in 1983. We’re celebrating our 30th Anniversary every #ThrowbackThursday.

Won’t you help us reach another 30 years?  

World’s best mom? Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute observed this deep-sea octopus brooding eggs for over four years—longer than any known animal. Watch this extreme parenting in action!

Have you gotten “into” the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary? Here’s just one more reason: celebrate Get Into Your Sanctuary Day this Saturday, August 2! Why not visit the beach, go whale watching, or (blush) visit the Aquarium?Get inspired to #VisitSanctuaries

Have you gotten “into” the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary? Here’s just one more reason: celebrate Get Into Your Sanctuary Day this Saturday, August 2! Why not visit the beach, go whale watching, or (blush) visit the Aquarium?

Get inspired to #VisitSanctuaries

How do you display deep-sea cephalopods like this vampire squid? It takes a big ship, a lot of scientists, and a robot. Learn how we do it, with the help of our colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, in our latest podcast.

Humpbacks aren’t the only species enjoying a bountiful summer in the bay—leatherback turtles are also being seen on local whale watching trips. This great shot from Jodi Frediani shows one enjoying a delicious meal of jellies. Did you know it’s our state marine reptile?

Humpbacks aren’t the only species enjoying a bountiful summer in the bay—leatherback turtles are also being seen on local whale watching trips. This great shot from Jodi Frediani shows one enjoying a delicious meal of jellies.

Did you know it’s our state marine reptile?

What a show! If you haven’t gone whale-watching—or spied them off our ocean-view decks—you better get going! It’s turning out to be another fantastic year. Massive schools of anchovies are attracting hundreds of dolphins, seals, birds and these gentle giants—it’s a feeding frenzy! 

Some boats are seeing 70 whales spread over several miles. Humpbacks are one of the more common baleen whales in the sanctuary, mostly during summer and fall as they feast on krill and schools of anchovies and sardines. A humpback can consume up to 3,000 pounds per day! They use use air bubbles to herd, corral or disorient fish. They often feed in the same spot for several days, making these whales easy to find. Humpbacks are the favorite of many whale-watchers, as these whales frequently perform aerial displays, such as breaching or slapping the surface with their pectoral fins, tails, or heads. These whales are believed to winter in the coastal waters of Mexico and Central America and like blue whales, are still considered endangered.

Learn more  

(Jim Capwell/divecentral.com)

Long-Distance Flyers
Think you travel a lot? The diminutive red knot probably has you beat, traveling from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego—a distance of 9,300 miles each way—each year. And it does it all under its own steam.
We just added two of these long distance flyers to our Aviary exhibit. You can also view them on our live web cam.
While red knots could put most business travelers to shame, ours have been forced to stick closer to home, due to permanent wing injuries. The pair (a male and female) flew here—in a plane—from the Florida Aquarium, which has hosted them for more than a decade.

Reading up on Red Knots
Red knots (Calidris canutus) are one of the larger sandpipers, and can live to a ripe age. Scientists recently discovered a 21-year-old. 
The birds, which grow to 10 inches, can occasionally be seen in local estuaries such as Elkhorn Slough. But these sightings are rare. These mileage champs breed in some of the coldest places in the world, and winter in some of the hottest. While they travel vast distances, red knots depend on certain stops along the way to fuel up, such as in Hudson Bay and Brazil. This can create challenges for the birds if food sources—particularly horseshoe crab eggs—are in short supply due to overharvesting.
“We’re really excited to have them,” says aviculturist Eric Miller. “Though they’re not technically endangered, red knots in some parts of the world are declining, and this is a great chance for people to see them.”

Long-Distance Flyers

Think you travel a lot? The diminutive red knot probably has you beat, traveling from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego—a distance of 9,300 miles each way—each year. And it does it all under its own steam.

We just added two of these long distance flyers to our Aviary exhibit. You can also view them on our live web cam.

While red knots could put most business travelers to shame, ours have been forced to stick closer to home, due to permanent wing injuries. The pair (a male and female) flew here—in a plane—from the Florida Aquarium, which has hosted them for more than a decade.

Reading up on Red Knots

Red knots (Calidris canutus) are one of the larger sandpipers, and can live to a ripe age. Scientists recently discovered a 21-year-old

The birds, which grow to 10 inches, can occasionally be seen in local estuaries such as Elkhorn Slough. But these sightings are rare. These mileage champs breed in some of the coldest places in the world, and winter in some of the hottest. While they travel vast distances, red knots depend on certain stops along the way to fuel up, such as in Hudson Bay and Brazil. This can create challenges for the birds if food sources—particularly horseshoe crab eggs—are in short supply due to overharvesting.

“We’re really excited to have them,” says aviculturist Eric Miller. “Though they’re not technically endangered, red knots in some parts of the world are declining, and this is a great chance for people to see them.”

Won’t you raise your hands for the Aquarium? We’d love your support in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards. Vote once per day!Vote now  (MCCVB photo)

Won’t you raise your hands for the Aquarium? We’d love your support in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards. Vote once per day!

Vote now 

 (MCCVB photo)

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.