Showing posts tagged as "monterey bay aquarium research institute"

True Facts About the Octopus

Ze Frank has done it again! His latest True Facts video offers his unique take on amazing octopuses — including giant Pacific octopus that he and his crew filmed on location here at the Aquarium. The video incorporates spectacular deep-sea octopus footage from our colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, too.

Whet your appetite for more? You can see these incredible animals in person starting April 12 when we open Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes.

Learn more about our new Tentacles special exhibition.

Love jellies? We have a new species, lemon jellies (Aegina citrea), in “The Jellies Experience”. They were collected here in the bay with the help of our sister organization, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and raised behind the scenes.  These jellies are unique because they swim with their tentacles out front, using them like a rake to catch other jellies.

This group (there are several species) also is one of the most abundant jellies in the bay, and is found in high numbers even in the oxygen minimum zone.

Learn more about MBARI

Learn more about “The Jellies Experience”

A Sea of Sponges


Sponges aren’t the stars of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, but their diversity of colors, shapes and sizes is eye-catching. And consider this: Every multi-celled animal on Earth is based on the genetic blueprint of sponges.They are truly the foundation of the animal kingdom.

Our sponges may not be as startling as the stove-pipe sponge that looks so much like the Cookie Monster from Sesame Street. They don’t have the personality of Spongebob Squarepants. But they’re fascinating animals with a vital role to play in healthy oceans.

Sponges populate many of our exhibits in the Ocean’s Edge galleries. You can get a closer look — and even discover what they feel like — at our touch pools.

They’re simple: a group of loosely connected, nearly independent cells, with no organs and no tissues. If broken apart, they can put themselves back together again. Many produce powerful chemicals to defend themselves — chemicals that have cancer-fighting properties

Globally, it’s estimated there are upwards of 10,000 to 15,000 species of sponges in the ocean — with thousands left to be discovered. Not long ago, our colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute documented a new carnivorous sponge: the harp sponge, pictured above.

The yellow goiter sponge, also pictured here, was spotted on an MBARI dive to the Pioneer Seamount. Some goiter sponges can grow to be nearly 10 feet across.

Photo credits: red volcano sponge and cobalt blue sponge, © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Steve Webster; orange puffball sponge, © Monterey Bay Aquarium/David Cripe; harp sponge and goiter sponge, © MBARI

We’re working hard to keep California sea otters happy—but it’s not always easy. Overall numbers are below what’s needed to move them off the endangered species list. Learn more in Countdown to Cuteness—and you could win a behind-the-scenes tour after our exhibit opens March 23! 

Check it out via your Desktop. 
Via your mobile. 
(Jim Capwell/www.divecentral.com)

We’re working hard to keep California sea otters happy—but it’s not always easy. Overall numbers are below what’s needed to move them off the endangered species list. Learn more in Countdown to Cuteness—and you could win a behind-the-scenes tour after our exhibit opens March 23!

Check it out via your Desktop

Via your mobile

(Jim Capwell/www.divecentral.com)

We recently added some beautiful fish to our Open Sea exhibit. Can you find them on our live HD web cam? (© Charlene Boarts)

We recently added some beautiful fish to our Open Sea exhibit. Can you find them on our live HD web cam(© Charlene Boarts)

Why are sea otter numbers declining or stagnant? Scientists would love to know. 
Learn more in Countdown to Cuteness—and you could win!
Check it out via your Desktop. 
Via your mobile. 

Why are sea otter numbers declining or stagnant? Scientists would love to know.

Learn more in Countdown to Cuteness—and you could win!

Check it out via your Desktop

Via your mobile

The sort-of gross diet of the “vampire squid from hell”

Our colleagues at MBARI – the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute – have been sharing videos and stories about the vampire squid for years. We in turn have been sharing them with visitors during our daily Mysteries of the Deep auditorium program.

Now MBARI researchers have solved the mystery of what these unusual deep-sea animals eat. It’s a fascinating tale, with a high gross-out factor – if you’re easily grossed out by animals that eat corpses, feces and mucus.

Turns out that the vampire squid, an ancient animal with characteristics of both squids and octopus, lives in a low-oxygen zone where living prey is scarce. But there’s an abundance of marine snow raining down, consisting largely of poop, dead bodies and mucus discarded by other ocean life.

So, unlike all other known cephalopod species, it hangs out, waiting for this manna to sink down, where it traps the goodies on filament-like tentacles, wraps them in mucus and gobbles it up.

This despite a Latin name (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) that translates as “vampire squid from hell.”

You’ll find much more in the video, on the MBARI website, and in this article from Discovery News.

Not as charming as the cast of Twilight, perhaps. But a mystery of the deep – solved.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.