Showing posts tagged as "open sea"

Need a reason to visit in the New Year? We have thousands (literally)! We also have extended hours Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy your holiday, and best wishes from all of us at the Aquarium!
Plan your visit

Need a reason to visit in the New Year? We have thousands (literally)! We also have extended hours Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy your holiday, and best wishes from all of us at the Aquarium!

Plan your visit

Ever wonder about our largest hammerhead shark? She’s more than 11 years old and weighs 150 pounds! 
Watch her now on our live web cam. 

Learn more and help save sharks!

Ever wonder about our largest hammerhead shark? She’s more than 11 years old and weighs 150 pounds! 

Watch her now on our live web cam

Learn more and help save sharks!

New Mola in Town!
There’s a new ocean sunfish on exhibit in the Open Sea.
Our Husbandry team added the sunfish (Mola mola) over the weekend and it’s acclimated very quickly. It’s swimming well and makes a beeline to the surface to feed when our staff puts a colored target in the water as a signal that it’s mealtime.
We collected the sunfish in Monterey Bay on September 11, when it was just over 2 feet long and weighed nearly 32 pounds. On October 25, when it went on exhibit, it was 2 ½ feet long and weighed 46 pounds – quite a growth spurt!
Then again, the Mola mola – its Latin name, which means “millstone” – DOES tend to get big. It’s the largest bony fish on Earth, with some individuals topping out at 5,000 pounds. One sunfish we exhibited grew to weigh nearly 900 pounds before we returned it to the wild, with the help of a helicopter.
We’ve temporarily moved our two green sea turtles behind the scenes to help the sunfish adjust to its new surroundings. Before it gets too large, we’ll fit the sunfish with a tracking tag and release it in Monterey Bay. Based on results from other sunfish we’ve released, it will do well and travel far.
Learn more about the Mola mola.  
Check in on the new ocean sunfish on our live Open Sea cam.
(© Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder)

New Mola in Town!

There’s a new ocean sunfish on exhibit in the Open Sea.

Our Husbandry team added the sunfish (Mola mola) over the weekend and it’s acclimated very quickly. It’s swimming well and makes a beeline to the surface to feed when our staff puts a colored target in the water as a signal that it’s mealtime.

We collected the sunfish in Monterey Bay on September 11, when it was just over 2 feet long and weighed nearly 32 pounds. On October 25, when it went on exhibit, it was 2 ½ feet long and weighed 46 pounds – quite a growth spurt!

Then again, the Mola mola – its Latin name, which means “millstone” – DOES tend to get big. It’s the largest bony fish on Earth, with some individuals topping out at 5,000 pounds. One sunfish we exhibited grew to weigh nearly 900 pounds before we returned it to the wild, with the help of a helicopter.

We’ve temporarily moved our two green sea turtles behind the scenes to help the sunfish adjust to its new surroundings. Before it gets too large, we’ll fit the sunfish with a tracking tag and release it in Monterey Bay. Based on results from other sunfish we’ve released, it will do well and travel far.

Learn more about the Mola mola.  

Check in on the new ocean sunfish on our live Open Sea cam.

(© Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder)

For the first time, we’ve added a beautiful school of 3,500 anchovies to the Open Sea exhibit. Combined with the thousands of sardines already in the exhibit, it makes for quite a dramatic scene!
Learn more about the Open Sea. 

For the first time, we’ve added a beautiful school of 3,500 anchovies to the Open Sea exhibit. Combined with the thousands of sardines already in the exhibit, it makes for quite a dramatic scene!

Learn more about the Open Sea. 

Is it possible to “fly” underwater? Visitors tell us that graceful pelagic rays are among their favorite animals at the Aquarium, and we just added two to our Open Sea exhibit!
Learn how we play “ring toss” with these amazing rays at feeding time.

Is it possible to “fly” underwater? Visitors tell us that graceful pelagic rays are among their favorite animals at the Aquarium, and we just added two to our Open Sea exhibit!

Learn how we play “ring toss” with these amazing rays at feeding time.

Did you know you can have a live Aquarium experience, no matter where you live? We’d love to know: What’s your favorite web cam?
Learn more about our live web cams. 

Did you know you can have a live Aquarium experience, no matter where you live? We’d love to know: What’s your favorite web cam?

Learn more about our live web cams

Sea Turtle Hatchling Heading to Monterey
Can sea turtles fly? Well, a young loggerhead sea turtle similar to the one pictured here will be airborne tomorrow, en route from North Carolina to an exhibit in our Open Sea galleries.
It’s flying coach to Monterey with Curator Steve Vogel. You can follow their progress on Wednesday using the Twitter hashtag #TravelingTurtle.
At the earliest, it could be on exhibit Thursday morning, depending on the outcome of its veterinary exam. (We’ll keep you posted.)
The turtle is one of nine hatchlings rescued earlier this year by our colleagues with the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. These turtles didn’t make it back to sea with their nest-mates, and were hand-raised at the aquarium.
All nine are being loaned out to aquariums around the country, where they’ll live for up to two years before they’re returned to North Carolina, tagged and released to the wild.
Our youngster is just over 4 inches long and weighs less than half a pound. By the time it leaves Monterey, it could be more than a foot long and weigh up to 15 pounds.
We won’t know if it’s a boy or a girl, though. Even experts can’t tell a sea turtle’s gender until it’s around 10 years old.
Look for tomorrow’s updates at #TravelingTurtle, then come check the little guy out for yourself. It will be on the second floor of the Open Sea, near the puffins and other seabirds, in an exhibit that highlights the threats facing sea turtles and other animals from unsustainable fishing practices.

Sea Turtle Hatchling Heading to Monterey

Can sea turtles fly? Well, a young loggerhead sea turtle similar to the one pictured here will be airborne tomorrow, en route from North Carolina to an exhibit in our Open Sea galleries.

It’s flying coach to Monterey with Curator Steve Vogel. You can follow their progress on Wednesday using the Twitter hashtag #TravelingTurtle.

At the earliest, it could be on exhibit Thursday morning, depending on the outcome of its veterinary exam. (We’ll keep you posted.)

The turtle is one of nine hatchlings rescued earlier this year by our colleagues with the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. These turtles didn’t make it back to sea with their nest-mates, and were hand-raised at the aquarium.

All nine are being loaned out to aquariums around the country, where they’ll live for up to two years before they’re returned to North Carolina, tagged and released to the wild.

Our youngster is just over 4 inches long and weighs less than half a pound. By the time it leaves Monterey, it could be more than a foot long and weigh up to 15 pounds.

We won’t know if it’s a boy or a girl, though. Even experts can’t tell a sea turtle’s gender until it’s around 10 years old.

Look for tomorrow’s updates at #TravelingTurtle, then come check the little guy out for yourself. It will be on the second floor of the Open Sea, near the puffins and other seabirds, in an exhibit that highlights the threats facing sea turtles and other animals from unsustainable fishing practices.

In a word, how would you describe your favorite visit to the Aquarium?
Never visited? Plan your trip!

In a word, how would you describe your favorite visit to the Aquarium?

Never visited? Plan your trip!

Is the mahi mahi the most beautiful fish in the sea? Some people think so, thanks to its iridescent body colors—metallic blues and greens on the back and sides, with white and yellow underneath. We just added two to our Open Sea exhibit!
Learn more about the dolphinfish (Mahi mahi).

Is the mahi mahi the most beautiful fish in the sea? Some people think so, thanks to its iridescent body colors—metallic blues and greens on the back and sides, with white and yellow underneath. We just added two to our Open Sea exhibit!

Learn more about the dolphinfish (Mahi mahi).

People tell us they love these two huge exhibits, which supply diver’s-eye views of the ocean around us. Which is YOUR favorite? 
Vote now via your desktop or your mobile.

People tell us they love these two huge exhibits, which supply diver’s-eye views of the ocean around us. Which is YOUR favorite?

Vote now via your desktop or your mobile.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.