Showing posts tagged as "open sea"

It’s hammertime on #SharkWeek tonight—and this hammerhead won’t stop! Scalloped hammerheads, like many sharks, must constantly swim to breathe. Watch these energetic animals—recently classified as endangered—glide by our live Open Sea cam.View now

It’s hammertime on #SharkWeek tonight—and this hammerhead won’t stop! Scalloped hammerheads, like many sharks, must constantly swim to breathe. Watch these energetic animals—recently classified as endangered—glide by our live Open Sea cam.

View now

Did you know that our popular pelagic rays come right over at feeding time? “They’re very charismatic,” says one aquarist, tossing them another shrimp. “They flip over on their backs and scoop the food in with their fins. It’s like playing ring toss at the carnival!” Watch them “fly” on our live cam

Did you know that our popular pelagic rays come right over at feeding time? “They’re very charismatic,” says one aquarist, tossing them another shrimp. “They flip over on their backs and scoop the food in with their fins. It’s like playing ring toss at the carnival!”

Watch them “fly” on our live cam


Fancy yourself a fast swimmer? Bluefin tuna speed across the Pacific Ocean in three weeks! But there’s one thing they can’t out-swim: overfishing. Learn how we’re studying and helping save these athletic animals

Fancy yourself a fast swimmer? Bluefin tuna speed across the Pacific Ocean in three weeks! But there’s one thing they can’t out-swim: overfishing.

Learn how we’re studying and helping save these athletic animals

Won’t you raise your hands for the Aquarium? We’d love your support in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards. Vote once per day!Vote now  (MCCVB photo)

Won’t you raise your hands for the Aquarium? We’d love your support in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards. Vote once per day!

Vote now 

 (MCCVB photo)

Look, but don’t touch! These delicate-looking jelly relatives are siphonophores, related to the notorious Portuguese man-of-war. Each comprises a floating colony, with specialized individuals to sting, eat, or just swim. 

Get a closer look at these unusual drifters and more in the Open Sea

This #ThrowbackThursday, can you guess what we were building here? Hint: it’s not a boat or a blimp…it’s an exhibit! We’re celebrating our 30th anniversary this year. Help us create incredible exhibits for another 30 years! Learn more

This #ThrowbackThursday, can you guess what we were building here? Hint: it’s not a boat or a blimp…it’s an exhibit! We’re celebrating our 30th anniversary this year. Help us create incredible exhibits for another 30 years! 

Learn more

Bizarre? Or beautiful? The ocean sunfish is a visitor fave. You can help save molas by reducing use of disposable plastic bags. When these wind up in the ocean, they look like jellies—a mola’s favorite meal.Learn more (Charlene Boarts)

Bizarre? Or beautiful? The ocean sunfish is a visitor fave. You can help save molas by reducing use of disposable plastic bags. When these wind up in the ocean, they look like jellies—a mola’s favorite meal.

Learn more

(Charlene Boarts)

How do you polish a 13-inch-thick, 54-foot-long window? Find out in our latest podcast! 

Open Sea Exhibit Helps “DNA Detectives” Study Marine Life
Move over TV crime scene investigators! Marine biologists are using DNA sequencing not to solve crimes, but to study ocean communities and they used the Open Sea exhibit as their test “lab.” The ocean is a veritable soup of biological material known as environmental DNA or eDNA. Just as humans slough off skin cells that can be used as identification, so too do fish shed tissue and other biological matter that enables marine biologists to identify the type of animal. Researchers from Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions - a partner of the Aquarium - and the University of Washington extracted eDNA from water samples taken from the Aquarium’s 1.2-million gallon exhibit.
Learn what they discovered!

Open Sea Exhibit Helps “DNA Detectives” Study Marine Life

Move over TV crime scene investigators! Marine biologists are using DNA sequencing not to solve crimes, but to study ocean communities and they used the Open Sea exhibit as their test “lab.” The ocean is a veritable soup of biological material known as environmental DNA or eDNA. Just as humans slough off skin cells that can be used as identification, so too do fish shed tissue and other biological matter that enables marine biologists to identify the type of animal. Researchers from Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions - a partner of the Aquarium - and the University of Washington extracted eDNA from water samples taken from the Aquarium’s 1.2-million gallon exhibit.

Learn what they discovered!

Need a reason to visit in the New Year? We have thousands (literally)! We also have extended hours Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy your holiday, and best wishes from all of us at the Aquarium!
Plan your visit

Need a reason to visit in the New Year? We have thousands (literally)! We also have extended hours Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy your holiday, and best wishes from all of us at the Aquarium!

Plan your visit

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.