Showing posts tagged as "open sea"

Won’t you raise your hands for the Aquarium? We’d love your support in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards. Vote once per day!Vote now  (MCCVB photo)

Won’t you raise your hands for the Aquarium? We’d love your support in the USA Today 10 Best Aquarium Travel Awards. Vote once per day!

Vote now 

 (MCCVB photo)

Look, but don’t touch! These delicate-looking jelly relatives are siphonophores, related to the notorious Portuguese man-of-war. Each comprises a floating colony, with specialized individuals to sting, eat, or just swim. 

Get a closer look at these unusual drifters and more in the Open Sea

This #ThrowbackThursday, can you guess what we were building here? Hint: it’s not a boat or a blimp…it’s an exhibit! We’re celebrating our 30th anniversary this year. Help us create incredible exhibits for another 30 years! Learn more

This #ThrowbackThursday, can you guess what we were building here? Hint: it’s not a boat or a blimp…it’s an exhibit! We’re celebrating our 30th anniversary this year. Help us create incredible exhibits for another 30 years! 

Learn more

Bizarre? Or beautiful? The ocean sunfish is a visitor fave. You can help save molas by reducing use of disposable plastic bags. When these wind up in the ocean, they look like jellies—a mola’s favorite meal.Learn more (Charlene Boarts)

Bizarre? Or beautiful? The ocean sunfish is a visitor fave. You can help save molas by reducing use of disposable plastic bags. When these wind up in the ocean, they look like jellies—a mola’s favorite meal.

Learn more

(Charlene Boarts)

How do you polish a 13-inch-thick, 54-foot-long window? Find out in our latest podcast! 

Open Sea Exhibit Helps “DNA Detectives” Study Marine Life
Move over TV crime scene investigators! Marine biologists are using DNA sequencing not to solve crimes, but to study ocean communities and they used the Open Sea exhibit as their test “lab.” The ocean is a veritable soup of biological material known as environmental DNA or eDNA. Just as humans slough off skin cells that can be used as identification, so too do fish shed tissue and other biological matter that enables marine biologists to identify the type of animal. Researchers from Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions - a partner of the Aquarium - and the University of Washington extracted eDNA from water samples taken from the Aquarium’s 1.2-million gallon exhibit.
Learn what they discovered!

Open Sea Exhibit Helps “DNA Detectives” Study Marine Life

Move over TV crime scene investigators! Marine biologists are using DNA sequencing not to solve crimes, but to study ocean communities and they used the Open Sea exhibit as their test “lab.” The ocean is a veritable soup of biological material known as environmental DNA or eDNA. Just as humans slough off skin cells that can be used as identification, so too do fish shed tissue and other biological matter that enables marine biologists to identify the type of animal. Researchers from Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions - a partner of the Aquarium - and the University of Washington extracted eDNA from water samples taken from the Aquarium’s 1.2-million gallon exhibit.

Learn what they discovered!

Need a reason to visit in the New Year? We have thousands (literally)! We also have extended hours Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy your holiday, and best wishes from all of us at the Aquarium!
Plan your visit

Need a reason to visit in the New Year? We have thousands (literally)! We also have extended hours Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy your holiday, and best wishes from all of us at the Aquarium!

Plan your visit

Ever wonder about our largest hammerhead shark? She’s more than 11 years old and weighs 150 pounds! 
Watch her now on our live web cam. 

Learn more and help save sharks!

Ever wonder about our largest hammerhead shark? She’s more than 11 years old and weighs 150 pounds! 

Watch her now on our live web cam

Learn more and help save sharks!

New Mola in Town!
There’s a new ocean sunfish on exhibit in the Open Sea.
Our Husbandry team added the sunfish (Mola mola) over the weekend and it’s acclimated very quickly. It’s swimming well and makes a beeline to the surface to feed when our staff puts a colored target in the water as a signal that it’s mealtime.
We collected the sunfish in Monterey Bay on September 11, when it was just over 2 feet long and weighed nearly 32 pounds. On October 25, when it went on exhibit, it was 2 ½ feet long and weighed 46 pounds – quite a growth spurt!
Then again, the Mola mola – its Latin name, which means “millstone” – DOES tend to get big. It’s the largest bony fish on Earth, with some individuals topping out at 5,000 pounds. One sunfish we exhibited grew to weigh nearly 900 pounds before we returned it to the wild, with the help of a helicopter.
We’ve temporarily moved our two green sea turtles behind the scenes to help the sunfish adjust to its new surroundings. Before it gets too large, we’ll fit the sunfish with a tracking tag and release it in Monterey Bay. Based on results from other sunfish we’ve released, it will do well and travel far.
Learn more about the Mola mola.  
Check in on the new ocean sunfish on our live Open Sea cam.
(© Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder)

New Mola in Town!

There’s a new ocean sunfish on exhibit in the Open Sea.

Our Husbandry team added the sunfish (Mola mola) over the weekend and it’s acclimated very quickly. It’s swimming well and makes a beeline to the surface to feed when our staff puts a colored target in the water as a signal that it’s mealtime.

We collected the sunfish in Monterey Bay on September 11, when it was just over 2 feet long and weighed nearly 32 pounds. On October 25, when it went on exhibit, it was 2 ½ feet long and weighed 46 pounds – quite a growth spurt!

Then again, the Mola mola – its Latin name, which means “millstone” – DOES tend to get big. It’s the largest bony fish on Earth, with some individuals topping out at 5,000 pounds. One sunfish we exhibited grew to weigh nearly 900 pounds before we returned it to the wild, with the help of a helicopter.

We’ve temporarily moved our two green sea turtles behind the scenes to help the sunfish adjust to its new surroundings. Before it gets too large, we’ll fit the sunfish with a tracking tag and release it in Monterey Bay. Based on results from other sunfish we’ve released, it will do well and travel far.

Learn more about the Mola mola.  

Check in on the new ocean sunfish on our live Open Sea cam.

(© Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder)

For the first time, we’ve added a beautiful school of 3,500 anchovies to the Open Sea exhibit. Combined with the thousands of sardines already in the exhibit, it makes for quite a dramatic scene!
Learn more about the Open Sea. 

For the first time, we’ve added a beautiful school of 3,500 anchovies to the Open Sea exhibit. Combined with the thousands of sardines already in the exhibit, it makes for quite a dramatic scene!

Learn more about the Open Sea. 

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.