Showing posts tagged as "plastics"

Support California AB 521: Help Protect Marine Life from Plastic Pollution!

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Each year thousands of seabirds, sea turtles and other marine life are harmed by plastic pollution in our oceans. That’s why we’re supporting California bill AB 521, which would set goals for reducing plastic pollution in our coastal waters and require producers of plastic products to join consumers and state and local governments in addressing the problem of marine plastic pollution. You can read the full text of the bill here.

If you’re a California resident, it’s easy to do your part:

1. Find your California representative.  

2. Use or adapt the following copy to send them a message: 

I am calling/e-mailing to urge you to vote “yes” on AB 521. This bill will help protect seabirds, sea turtles and other ocean animals that I care about from the harmful impacts of marine plastic pollution. It will set reasonable targets for reducing marine plastic pollution in California’s ocean waters and require producers of plastic products to join consumers and state and local governments in addressing the problem of marine plastic pollution. Thank you for considering this important issue and working to protect our oceans.

How Plastics Impact Our Oceans

Plastic is one of the biggest pollution problems impacting the world’s oceans. Everyday items such as single-use plastic containers and packaging can have significant impacts on ocean life. A 2012 study by the Convention on Biological Diversity found that 663 different marine species are impacted by plastic pollution.

Plastic products find their way to the ocean through storm drains, streams and rivers and may be mistaken for food, as they break down into smaller particles that resemble small fish or krill. Some plastics can travel ocean currents all the way to the North Pacific Central Gyre where they are picked up by Laysan albatrosses like our Aquarium resident albatross Makana, shown above. Scientists estimate that each year, around 4.5 metric tons of plastics are brought onto Midway Island in the remote Pacific Ocean by albatrosses feeding plastic to their young. The canister shown on this page is the contents of one albatross’s stomach!

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How AB 521 Helps

AB 521 would incentivize actions like redesigning products and improving product recycling. The bill would set reasonable targets for reducing marine plastic pollution through these and other actions and also provide much-needed funding for state and local plastic pollution cleanup efforts.

Thank you from the Monterey Bay Aquarium for supporting this important bill!

Learn more about Makana and ocean plastics.

Learn about our plastics exhibit, which showcases spectacular art installations and photo collages created from everyday plastics.

Our latest art exhibit explores the impact of plastic pollution on migrating animals. Learn more in our new podcast! 

Have you had a chance to stroll through our new plastics gallery in the Open Sea wing? It includes spectacular art installations and photo collages from artists all over the world, created from everyday plastic.

Enjoy the art—and learn what you can do to reduce plastic use

Have you met Makana, our beautiful Laysan albatross? You can! Check out this great video and blog from the Humane Society during a recent visit. 
Learn more about Makana and plastics in our oceans. 

Have you met Makana, our beautiful Laysan albatross? You can! Check out this great video and blog from the Humane Society during a recent visit. 

Learn more about Makana and plastics in our oceans

Starting June 8, the Carl Cherry Center for the Arts in Carmel presents “False Food,” a photo exhibition by Jerry Takigawa featuring plastic artifacts from the Pacific Gyre and the remains of albatross on Midway Island. Jerry’s work has been featured at the Aquarium, and on June 22  at 7 pm he will introduce our climate change specialist Sarah-Mae Nelson, who shares ways to reduce  plastic from our lives and help heal the oceans.

Starting June 8, the Carl Cherry Center for the Arts in Carmel presents “False Food,” a photo exhibition by Jerry Takigawa featuring plastic artifacts from the Pacific Gyre and the remains of albatross on Midway Island. Jerry’s work has been featured at the Aquarium, and on June 22  at 7 pm he will introduce our climate change specialist Sarah-Mae Nelson, who shares ways to reduce  plastic from our lives and help heal the oceans.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.