Showing posts tagged as "shark"

New Future for Great White Sharks?
 Should great white sharks in the Northeastern Pacific be placed on the endangered species list? That’s the issue being considered by Californa and U.S. wildlife officials, who have received petitions calling for protection under state and federal Endangered Species acts.
The Aquarium is very supportive of this process, and we’re assisting in any way we can so the final decision is based on the best, most current science.
Much of what’s known about the lives of adult and juvenile great white sharks today – from migration patterns and population size, to the contaminant levels in their tissues – is the result of studies in which the Aquarium, along with a broad consortium of scientists from Stanford, UC Davis, CSU Long Beach and other institutions, has played a key role.
There’s more public concern about the future of great white sharks in part because we have, since 2004, introduced more than 3 million people to a half-dozen young sharks face-to-face in our Open Sea exhibit. Visitors tell us that the experience changed their attitudes and say they were inspired to help protect white sharks in the wild.
While the review process is under way, we’ve decided not to collect white sharks for exhibit. It’s our hope that any new policies protecting white sharks will allow for occasional exhibit of white sharks (before their return to the wild) and for a vigorous field research program. Both public engagement and research are essential to assure a future for white sharks.
Learn more about our white shark research program. 
 
 

New Future for Great White Sharks?

Should great white sharks in the Northeastern Pacific be placed on the endangered species list? That’s the issue being considered by Californa and U.S. wildlife officials, who have received petitions calling for protection under state and federal Endangered Species acts.

The Aquarium is very supportive of this process, and we’re assisting in any way we can so the final decision is based on the best, most current science.

Much of what’s known about the lives of adult and juvenile great white sharks today – from migration patterns and population size, to the contaminant levels in their tissues – is the result of studies in which the Aquarium, along with a broad consortium of scientists from Stanford, UC Davis, CSU Long Beach and other institutions, has played a key role.

There’s more public concern about the future of great white sharks in part because we have, since 2004, introduced more than 3 million people to a half-dozen young sharks face-to-face in our Open Sea exhibit. Visitors tell us that the experience changed their attitudes and say they were inspired to help protect white sharks in the wild.

While the review process is under way, we’ve decided not to collect white sharks for exhibit. It’s our hope that any new policies protecting white sharks will allow for occasional exhibit of white sharks (before their return to the wild) and for a vigorous field research program. Both public engagement and research are essential to assure a future for white sharks.

Learn more about our white shark research program.

 

 

Need to spice up the desktop of that new computer or phone you got over the holidays? How about a hammerhead shark wallpaper?
View all our computer wallpapers and cover images for your mobile phone or social media page.

Need to spice up the desktop of that new computer or phone you got over the holidays? How about a hammerhead shark wallpaper?

View all our computer wallpapers and cover images for your mobile phone or social media page.

Love sharks? We’re happy to report that we added a sevengill to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit, seven feet in total length and 97 pounds.
Learn more about the sevengill shark and how we’re helping save sharks. 

Love sharks? We’re happy to report that we added a sevengill to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit, seven feet in total length and 97 pounds.

Learn more about the sevengill shark and how we’re helping save sharks

Hey, is that a penguin on your pumpkin? We created five great sea creature stencils to use this Halloween, including a penguin, seahorse, sea turtle and hammerhead shark. Print one and give it a try!

We just released a healthy sevengill shark into the bay. She was on exhibit for a year, gaining 2.5 inches and 14.5 pounds! This rotation of sevengills through our exhibit is great for shark fans—and shark conservation. By displaying, tagging and releasing these beautiful animals, we’re learning more about sharks and what can be done to save them.

We just released a healthy sevengill shark into the bay. She was on exhibit for a year, gaining 2.5 inches and 14.5 pounds! This rotation of sevengills through our exhibit is great for shark fans—and shark conservation. By displaying, tagging and releasing these beautiful animals, we’re learning more about sharks and what can be done to save them.

What are all those spots on the underside of this shark, and what do they do? Any guesses?
Answer: To hunt prey, a shark depends on its “ampullae of Lorenzini,” a series of jelly-filled canals on its snout that sense electrical impulses. Combined with the sense of smell, this “force-field” detector makes the white shark an efficient predator.

What are all those spots on the underside of this shark, and what do they do? Any guesses?

Answer: To hunt prey, a shark depends on its “ampullae of Lorenzini,” a series of jelly-filled canals on its snout that sense electrical impulses. Combined with the sense of smell, this “force-field” detector makes the white shark an efficient predator.

Now that’s using your head! Learn how the hammerhead shark’s unique shape helps it move and find food, in our latest podcast. 

Now that’s using your head! Learn how the hammerhead shark’s unique shape helps it move and find food, in our latest podcast

Fun fact for Shark Week: Where do sharks go? Our researchers have made surprising discoveries. Tagged sharks traveled from Southern California down the Baja Peninsula. Adult white sharks off Northern California have journeyed to the Eastern Pacific and the “Shark Café,” and as far west as Hawaii. Some made 1,000-foot dives! Check out this Today.com interview with our researchers, and see shark travels in real time at the GTOPP website.
Learn more about shark conservation at the Aquarium.

Fun fact for Shark Week: Where do sharks go? Our researchers have made surprising discoveries. Tagged sharks traveled from Southern California down the Baja Peninsula. Adult white sharks off Northern California have journeyed to the Eastern Pacific and the “Shark Café,” and as far west as Hawaii. Some made 1,000-foot dives! Check out this Today.com interview with our researchers, and see shark travels in real time at the GTOPP website.

Learn more about shark conservation at the Aquarium.


It’s a tale of two swimmers! Find out how our sandbar shark and tuna keep it moving in The Open Sea exhibit in our latest podcast. Listen now.

It’s a tale of two swimmers! Find out how our sandbar shark and tuna keep it moving in The Open Sea exhibit in our latest podcast. Listen now.

Love sharks? Last night we added a beautiful, 141-pound sevengill shark to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit. One reason that the Aquarium displays and releases large sharks—like our new sevengill—is to increase awareness of the challenges sharks face worldwide.
Learn more about shark conservation at the Aquarium.
Learn more about the sevengill shark.

Love sharks? Last night we added a beautiful, 141-pound sevengill shark to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit. One reason that the Aquarium displays and releases large sharks—like our new sevengill—is to increase awareness of the challenges sharks face worldwide.

Learn more about shark conservation at the Aquarium.

Learn more about the sevengill shark.

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.