Showing posts tagged as "sharks"

Happy #Friday! Love sharks? We just added a beautiful female sevengill to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit! It’s 59 inches long and weighs just over 30 pounds. Learn more Learn how we’re helping save sharks(Christopher Michel)

Happy #Friday! Love sharks? We just added a beautiful female sevengill to the Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit! It’s 59 inches long and weighs just over 30 pounds.

Learn more 

Learn how we’re helping save sharks

(Christopher Michel)

Good news! NOAA Fisheries just gave scalloped hammerhead sharks protection under the Endangered Species Act!  Sharks worldwide are in danger because of “finning” for shark fin soup, and accidental bycatch. We’re glad to have played a lead role in passage of the shark fin ban in California, a movement that’s spreading to many other states – and even to China! Learn moreWatch them live on exhibit

Good news! NOAA Fisheries just gave scalloped hammerhead sharks protection under the Endangered Species Act!  Sharks worldwide are in danger because of “finning” for shark fin soup, and accidental bycatch. We’re glad to have played a lead role in passage of the shark fin ban in California, a movement that’s spreading to many other states – and even to China!

Learn more

Watch them live on exhibit

How do you FIN-gerprint a Great White Shark?

To the untrained eye, one shark fin cutting through the water probably looks like any other. Yet each great white shark dorsal fin gives our researchers and their colleagues important clues that will help to identify and protect them.   

Like the swirls on a human fingerprint, the shape and notches of each white shark’s dorsal fin are unique, enabling scientists to catalog and track sharks across the oceans.  

Building a Fin Photo Database

Since 1987, great white shark researchers at the aquarium, Stanford University, Point Blue, Montana State University and the University of California, Davis, have been photographing dorsal fins –  first in waters off the Farallon Islands, and later at Año Nuevo Island and Tomales Point. They’ve created a photo database identifying 270 individuals over the past quarter century, providing the basis for the first-ever population estimate of adult and adolescent white sharks off the Central California coast.

This database helps scientists better understand where white sharks go and whether they return to the same waters on a regular basis. Fin IDs also help them estimate the number white sharks at these locations, and monitor the survival of individual animals.

Scientists have found that just as humans routinely travel between important locations — home, school, work — so too do great white sharks. White sharks congregate seasonally at spots along a migration route that takes them from the Central California coast, to the middle of the Pacific, and past southern California and Mexico.

Familiar Fins

Scientists use seal-shaped decoys to entice white sharks to the surface where it’s easy to photograph their fins. They also gather information such as size and sex when the sharks swim alongside their research boats. By comparing fin photos of the same sharks over the years, researchers concluded that – just as with our fingerprints, which remain the same over a lifetime – the overall shape of a shark fin remains fairly constant (with the exception of scrapes and scars).

In 2013, of the 80 individual adult white sharks photographed by researchers from the Aquarium and other institutions, nearly 65 percent had been seen in previous years. This suggests that the team is getting close to recognizing most of the adult great white sharks that frequent Central California waters.

Several have been coming back to the same waters for more than 20 years. One, a 16-foot male known as “Tom Johnson,” has been sighted for the last 26 years -  the longest tracking period for any white shark on earth. 

Learn more about white shark conservation

On the seventh day of the ocean, my true love gave to me… 7 Sharks-a-Swimming! 
Click an ornament every day to as we count down 12 Days of Ocean Cuteness

On the seventh day of the ocean, my true love gave to me… 7 Sharks-a-Swimming!

Click an ornament every day to as we count down 12 Days of Ocean Cuteness

Love sharks? Join us just before we open our doors to the public and discover over a dozen species of sharks, skates and rays that call the Aquarium home.
Learn more. 

Love sharks? Join us just before we open our doors to the public and discover over a dozen species of sharks, skates and rays that call the Aquarium home.

Learn more

Ever wonder about our largest hammerhead shark? She’s more than 11 years old and weighs 150 pounds! 
Watch her now on our live web cam. 

Learn more and help save sharks!

Ever wonder about our largest hammerhead shark? She’s more than 11 years old and weighs 150 pounds! 

Watch her now on our live web cam

Learn more and help save sharks!

How Swell!

A days-old baby swell shark is on exhibit in our Kelp Forest. The green-eyed shark is just one of many baby swells that regularly hatch inside the bustling exhibit.

It’s a lucky visitor that gets to see a baby or even an adult; they’re a big hit when they appear during the feeding show. This small (up to three feet), harmless and well-camouflaged shark prefers to hide in rocky crevices during the day, and feeds at night.

We often move young swells from the Kelp Forest to the small exhibits at the nearby touch pool, allowing visitors to get a close look at these beautiful sharks. As they grow, we move some to other exhibits, until they may eventually wind up back in the Kelp Forest exhibit.

We might trade adult swells with other aquariums in return for other species. Some we release into Monterey Bay via a detour into the outdoor Great Tide Pool, where they delight young kids participating in our Underwater Explorers summer program.

The swell shark is named for its unique defense posture. If threatened, it curls into a sharp U-shape, grasps its tail (caudal fin) in its mouth and swallows a large quantity of sea water, swelling to twice its normal size. This behavior makes it difficult for a predator to bite or evict a swell shark from its hiding spot.

 Learn more about the swell shark

Love sharks? We just added a 6-foot, 71-pound sevengill shark to our Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit, collected from San Francisco Bay. Besides being beautiful to look at, these sharks are part of ongoing research designed to help save sharks.
Learn more.

Love sharks? We just added a 6-foot, 71-pound sevengill shark to our Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit, collected from San Francisco Bay. Besides being beautiful to look at, these sharks are part of ongoing research designed to help save sharks.

Learn more.

Fifteen-foot white shark bites robot? Now that’s a battle of the titans! An underwater research robot from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute recently came back with shark teeth embedded in its aluminum hull.
This underwater robot, known as Tethys, just came back from two continuous weeks at sea, helping MBARI scientists monitor harmful algal blooms as part of the Fall 2013 CANON experiment. When MBARI engineers pulled the long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LR-AUV) from the water they discovered large scrapes on its sides. Based on the gape of the bite mark, shark expert Dave Ebert from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories estimates that it was a 15-foot-long white shark that attacked the AUV!
Learn more by following MBARI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MBARInews

Fifteen-foot white shark bites robot? Now that’s a battle of the titans! An underwater research robot from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute recently came back with shark teeth embedded in its aluminum hull.

This underwater robot, known as Tethys, just came back from two continuous weeks at sea, helping MBARI scientists monitor harmful algal blooms as part of the Fall 2013 CANON experiment. When MBARI engineers pulled the long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LR-AUV) from the water they discovered large scrapes on its sides. Based on the gape of the bite mark, shark expert Dave Ebert from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories estimates that it was a 15-foot-long white shark that attacked the AUV!

Learn more by following MBARI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MBARInews

Love sharks? We just added two beautiful male sevengills to our Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit, collected in San Francisco Bay. One is seven feet and 84 pounds; the other is six feet and 53 pounds. These sharks are tagged and will eventually be released as part of our efforts to learn more about sharks, which are threatened worldwide.
Learn more. 

Love sharks? We just added two beautiful male sevengills to our Monterey Bay Habitats exhibit, collected in San Francisco Bay. One is seven feet and 84 pounds; the other is six feet and 53 pounds. These sharks are tagged and will eventually be released as part of our efforts to learn more about sharks, which are threatened worldwide.

Learn more

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.