Showing posts tagged as "squid"

We’ve posted photos of the amazing bigfin reef squid before—but no two images are alike! Like many cephalopods, these squid use pigmented skin cells, called chromatophores, to change color and pattern.

Check them out when Tentacles opens April 12 

Enter to win a behind-the-scenes tour


Need a new wallpaper for your computer or mobile phone? This bigfin reef squid is one of the many amazing species you’ll see when our Tentacles special exhibition opens April 12. Download the wallpaper now.Enter to win an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour.

Need a new wallpaper for your computer or mobile phone? This bigfin reef squid is one of the many amazing species you’ll see when our Tentacles special exhibition opens April 12.

Download the wallpaper now.


Enter to win an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour.


Has this bobtail squid mastered the invisibility cloak? At night it uses symbiotic bacteria to hide its silhouette. It’s just one more species we’re investigating for “Tentacles,” the special exhibition opening next spring that focuses on octopuses, cuttlefish and their kin. Our aquarists are really flexing their creative muscles in preparation for the big show! 
Learn more about “Tentacles.”

Has this bobtail squid mastered the invisibility cloak? At night it uses symbiotic bacteria to hide its silhouette. It’s just one more species we’re investigating for “Tentacles,” the special exhibition opening next spring that focuses on octopuses, cuttlefish and their kin. Our aquarists are really flexing their creative muscles in preparation for the big show! 

Learn more about “Tentacles.”

Bringing You Behind the Scenes: A Look Inside Our “Tentacles” Laboratory

Ever wonder how you raise a baby squid? No one knows for sure, but if you’re Aquarist Chris Payne, you start with a trip to the hardware store for these unlikely ingredients: fishing line, plastic ties and Super Glue.

“The eggs need to be suspended in water, just like they are in the wild,” Chris says of cultivating bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) eggs. He explains that these squid attach their eggs to rocks or corals—anywhere they can be hidden. To replicate this behind the scenes, our aquarists rig up cool contraptions like this one—an inventive way of hanging the eggs in order for them to hatch. 

The aquarists cleverly use monofilament line to sew through the tips of the pods, or “fingers,” gather them in small clusters, then suspend them using plastic ties. But other methods work, too. “It doesn’t matter how you hang them. We’ve even Super-Glued them to a solid structure hanging just below the surface of the water,” Chris says. 

We’re currently raising about 300 pods, each containing two to six embryos. Suspending the eggs also allows aquarists to observe their growth. “You can actually see the embryo developing inside,” Chris says. The eggs grow in the three-inch pods for two to three weeks, and swell in size before hatching out. The squid are barely a quarter-inch long when they hatch but can grow to more than a foot. 

Bigfin reef squid are just one of the fascinating species that’ll be on exhibit in “Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes,” opening next spring. It’ll feature a dozen species of octopuses and their kin—some of which have never been shown before. 

As our aquarists work to cultivate and care for these mysterious creatures, we’ll be sharing more behind-the-scenes stories like this. So stay tuned!

Learn more about “Tentacles”






Can you find them? We just added adult market squid to the anchovies exhibit in the Open Sea. Staffer Joe Welsh collected them in the bay last week. It’s one more species you might see in “Tentacles,” our special exhibition opening next spring. Check out these squid soon if you’re interested, as they don’t live long!
 
Learn more about Tentacles, our forthcoming exhibit.
 
 
Can you find them? We just added adult market squid to the anchovies exhibit in the Open Sea. Staffer Joe Welsh collected them in the bay last week. It’s one more species you might see in “Tentacles,” our special exhibition opening next spring. Check out these squid soon if you’re interested, as they don’t live long!
 
 
Visitor from another planet? For the first time ever, we have bigfin reef squid (Sepiateuthis lessonouiana) in our Splash Zone exhibit!
Bigfin reef squid grow to 16 inches and live about a year; the ones on display are several months old.  We hatched these from eggs we received earlier in the year from Japan. Like their squid and cuttlefish relatives, they feed on fish and crustaceans. They inhabit shallow temperate and tropical coastal waters in the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Hawaiian Islands.  Unlike our local market and Humboldt squid, bigfin spend most of their time near coastal rocks and reefs.  In many ways they look like cuttlefish due to their large fins and habit of sculling near reef structures.  
Learn more about our Splash Zone exhibit.

Visitor from another planet? For the first time ever, we have bigfin reef squid (Sepiateuthis lessonouiana) in our Splash Zone exhibit!

Bigfin reef squid grow to 16 inches and live about a year; the ones on display are several months old.  We hatched these from eggs we received earlier in the year from Japan. Like their squid and cuttlefish relatives, they feed on fish and crustaceans. They inhabit shallow temperate and tropical coastal waters in the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Hawaiian Islands.  Unlike our local market and Humboldt squid, bigfin spend most of their time near coastal rocks and reefs.  In many ways they look like cuttlefish due to their large fins and habit of sculling near reef structures.  

Learn more about our Splash Zone exhibit.

Ever seen a Humboldt squid when it’s angry? Watch this one squirt and do a quick color change!

Learn more about Humboldt squid research at the Aquarium.

Did you see them? Visitors and staff were surprised to see Humboldt squid off our back deck over the weekend! They would surf up on the beach and strand when the waves receded, then wash back into the water, then back up on the beach. The local gulls started picking at them and the squid started inking!

Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) can reach over six feet and are voracious predators.They’ve moved into the area in large numbers in recent years. Prior to this, we only found an occasional specimen in this area, primarily associated with El Nino warming. This species is traditionally found on both sides of the Baja California peninsula and occasionally into Southern California. This may be due to warming ocean temperatures along this coast or some other phenomenon we don’t understand yet.

Learn more about Humboldt squid research at the Aquarium.

The sort-of gross diet of the “vampire squid from hell”

Our colleagues at MBARI – the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute – have been sharing videos and stories about the vampire squid for years. We in turn have been sharing them with visitors during our daily Mysteries of the Deep auditorium program.

Now MBARI researchers have solved the mystery of what these unusual deep-sea animals eat. It’s a fascinating tale, with a high gross-out factor – if you’re easily grossed out by animals that eat corpses, feces and mucus.

Turns out that the vampire squid, an ancient animal with characteristics of both squids and octopus, lives in a low-oxygen zone where living prey is scarce. But there’s an abundance of marine snow raining down, consisting largely of poop, dead bodies and mucus discarded by other ocean life.

So, unlike all other known cephalopod species, it hangs out, waiting for this manna to sink down, where it traps the goodies on filament-like tentacles, wraps them in mucus and gobbles it up.

This despite a Latin name (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) that translates as “vampire squid from hell.”

You’ll find much more in the video, on the MBARI website, and in this article from Discovery News.

Not as charming as the cast of Twilight, perhaps. But a mystery of the deep – solved.

Is it a visitor from another planet? Actually, these juvenile bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) are being raised behind the scenes for possible future exhibit. Very few aquariums in the world are displaying this bizarre species, and we hatched these from eggs sent to us from Indonesia!

Is it a visitor from another planet? Actually, these juvenile bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) are being raised behind the scenes for possible future exhibit. Very few aquariums in the world are displaying this bizarre species, and we hatched these from eggs sent to us from Indonesia!

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.