Showing posts tagged as "sustainable seafood"

From Collapse to Recovery: A Seafood Success Story!
Just 14 years after the groundfish fishery on the U.S. west coast was declared a commercial failure and an economic disaster, our Seafood Watch program just upgraded 21 species that are recovering in the wild and are now sustainable choices for seafood lovers.
It’s a dramatic turnaround — the most dramatic in the 15-year history of Seafood Watch — and reflects significant improvements in federal fishery management to restore these economically important fisheries in California, Oregon and Washington. It also underscores the important roles that fishermen and our colleagues in the sustainable seafood movement play in bringing the oceans back to health.
The new Seafood Watch rankings mean that species like rockfishes (often sold commercially as “snapper”), as well as spiny dogfish, lingcod and a number of flatfishes, including Dover sole, sand dabs and starry flounder are back on the menu.
"This is one of the great success stories about ecological and economic recovery of a commercially important fishery,” says Margaret Spring, vice president of conservation and science, and chief conservation officer for the Aquarium.
“Not long ago many of these species were in collapse,” says Tim Fitzgerald, who manages the sustainable seafood program for the Environmental Defense Fund – one of the organizations that worked with fishermen and fisheries managers on the turnaround. “Thanks to smarter fishing regulations and fishermen’s commitment to conservation, consumers and seafood businesses can now add West Coast groundfish to their list of sustainable choices.”
Learn more about the recovery of this important fishery.

From Collapse to Recovery: A Seafood Success Story!

Just 14 years after the groundfish fishery on the U.S. west coast was declared a commercial failure and an economic disaster, our Seafood Watch program just upgraded 21 species that are recovering in the wild and are now sustainable choices for seafood lovers.

It’s a dramatic turnaround  the most dramatic in the 15-year history of Seafood Watch — and reflects significant improvements in federal fishery management to restore these economically important fisheries in California, Oregon and Washington. It also underscores the important roles that fishermen and our colleagues in the sustainable seafood movement play in bringing the oceans back to health.

The new Seafood Watch rankings mean that species like rockfishes (often sold commercially as “snapper”), as well as spiny dogfish, lingcod and a number of flatfishes, including Dover sole, sand dabs and starry flounder are back on the menu.

"This is one of the great success stories about ecological and economic recovery of a commercially important fishery,” says Margaret Spring, vice president of conservation and science, and chief conservation officer for the Aquarium.

“Not long ago many of these species were in collapse,” says Tim Fitzgerald, who manages the sustainable seafood program for the Environmental Defense Fund – one of the organizations that worked with fishermen and fisheries managers on the turnaround. “Thanks to smarter fishing regulations and fishermen’s commitment to conservation, consumers and seafood businesses can now add West Coast groundfish to their list of sustainable choices.”

Learn more about the recovery of this important fishery.

Hacking for Healthy Oceans

For 36 hours over Father’s Day Weekend, the Aquarium hosted an unusual sleepover. Few of the participants got much rest.

We were one of five sites for a first-ever State Department-sponsored Fishackathon. The goal was to find technological solutions so fishermen in the developing world can make their catch more sustainable.

Teams of coders, designers and project managers created website solutions and apps for smartphones and cell phones - tools that small-scale fishermen can use in places like West Africa and the Philippines to document their catch and report illegal fishing.

Nearly 40 participants gathered on a Friday night in Monterey with laptops, sleeping bags - and novel ideas for creating tools that will be effective in parts of the world where internet access and high-tech equipment is limited. By Sunday morning, they had solutions to offer.

In addition to tackling two State Department problem statements, we also asked our hackers to help with a Seafood Watch challenge: How can information about how fish were caught travel through the supply chain from the boat where it’s landed to the market or restaurant where it’s finally sold?

The outcome? Incredible.

The results were beyond our wildest expectations.

A four-person team we welcomed from the UC-Berkeley School of Information won the top national prize for “Fish DB”, a multi-layered solution to one of the State Department challenges. And a three-person team that formed during the Fishackathon won the Seafood Watch challenge with its “Go Fish!” app: a simple labeling system using colors and numbers to show sustainability and freshness of seafood items. The app incorporates gaming principles, rewards and social sharing features to encourage consumers to buy ocean-friendly seafood.

"I can’t believe what great results these teams produced over the weekend!" said Jennifer Dianto Kemmerly, director of Seafood Watch. "We will definitely tap into the talents of hackers in the future."

An appealing location

It might not be too hard to lure them back to Monterey, if comments from the Berkeley team are any indication. They used words like “epic” and “thrilled” to describe sleeping in front of the Kelp Forest and Open Sea, and having access to the knowledge of Aquarium staff and State Department experts.

“We had a blast!” team member Isha Dandavate told the UC-Berkeley news service. “I can’t even express how cool it was. Having the hackathon in an aquarium has sort of ruined us for all other hackathons.”

The State Department was equally thrilled, and is now making plans for a 2015 Fishackathon around World Oceans Day.

Learn how your everyday choices can support healthy oceans

#Hackathon for Healthy Oceans

Calling all coders (and designers and project managers, too)!

The State Department and the Aquarium need your talents for a project supporting ocean wildlife and healthy oceans.

It all takes place during a #Fishackathon in Monterey, beginning under the full moon on Friday, June 13.

We’ll feed you and put you up at the Aquarium for two days while you #CodeForFish – with our living exhibits as your inspiration. It’s a chance to use your skills to tackle two big fisheries challenges that need solutions if we want our oceans – and ocean wildlife – to stay healthy for future generations.

National event, with prizes

The hackathon in Monterey is one of five simultaneous events taking place across the country during the first-ever #Fishackathon.

Prizes for the cleanest code and best solutions include cash prizes of $5,000 and $1,000, a trip to the Philippines, and a Monterey vacation getaway.

The winning teams will be part of a Google Hangout on Monday, June 16 during the State Department’s Our Ocean 2014 Ocean Summit in Washington, DC.

We’re looking for teams of Silicon Valley’s best and brightest for a day and two nights of creative coding, design and project management, ending Sunday morning, June 15.

Learn more, and register for the Silicon Valley #Fishackathon

Did you know that the seafood choices you make can help support healthy oceans? Not all fish are caught or farmed in environmentally responsible ways, but each of us has the power – by the way we choose to spend our money – to shape demand for seafood that’s been caught or farmed sustainably.

This new video from our Seafood Watch program quickly shows you how you can help protect the ocean just by asking your local grocery store or restaurant if they serve sustainable seafood. The oceans will thank you for it!

The Seafood Watch program provides scientifically based recommendations on what seafood options are best for the environment. You can also download the free Seafood Watch app or pick up a consumer pocket guide today.

Learn more about choosing sustainable seafood!

Did you know that wild-caught sardines from the U.S. are a Seafood Watch “Best Choice?” Try them grilled with salsa verde, from Chris Cosentino, executive chef of Incanto, San Francisco, and co-founder of Boccalone, San Francisco, and Pigg, Los Angeles. Get the recipe.

Did you know that wild-caught sardines from the U.S. are a Seafood Watch “Best Choice?” Try them grilled with salsa verde, from Chris Cosentino, executive chef of Incanto, San Francisco, and co-founder of Boccalone, San Francisco, and Pigg, Los Angeles. Get the recipe.

Have you updated your Seafood Watch app for iPhone or Android? Search is now much more intuitive. Get or update the app, and let us know what you think!

Have you updated your Seafood Watch app for iPhone or Android? Search is now much more intuitive. Get or update the app, and let us know what you think!

Help create healthier oceans with our sustainable recipes. Tender and sweet, scallops are best when seared at a medium-high temperature until golden on the outside but still slightly translucent in the center. Learn more.
Wild-caught sea scallops from the U.S. Atlantic are on the Seafood Watch yellow, “Good Alternatives" list. The majority of farmed scallops worldwide are a "Best Choices" because the way they’re raised presents few threats to the environment.

Help create healthier oceans with our sustainable recipes. Tender and sweet, scallops are best when seared at a medium-high temperature until golden on the outside but still slightly translucent in the center. Learn more.

Wild-caught sea scallops from the U.S. Atlantic are on the Seafood Watch yellow, “Good Alternatives" list. The majority of farmed scallops worldwide are a "Best Choices" because the way they’re raised presents few threats to the environment.

This Month’s Recipes: Albacore Tuna

This firm, mild-flavored fish is best grilled or sautéed until seared on the outside but still rare on the inside. It’s also delicious raw. Olive oil and Mediterranean seasonings are natural complements, as are ginger and soy sauce.

Troll- or pole-and-line-caught albacore tuna from the U.S. Pacific and British Columbia is on the Seafood Watch green, “Best Choices" list.

Albacore Tuna with Cucumber, Orange and Mint Relish, by Kristine Kidd

Seared Albacore Tuna with Wilted Spinach, by Michel Nischan

Your seafood choices help ensure a future with healthy oceans! This month we feature two recipes for rich-flavored coho salmon. Wild-caught Alaska coho is a “Best Choice,” while coho caught in California and the Northwest is a “Good Alternative.”

Your seafood choices help promote healthy oceans, and striped bass from the U.S. is on our Seafood Watch “Best Choices” list! In this easy-to-make curry from chef Raghavan Iyer, the subtle fish is enhanced by perfumed cardamom, sweet fennel, and assertive chiles and garlic. Serve with steaming white basmati rice, sautéed spinach and red bell peppers. Learn more!

Your seafood choices help promote healthy oceans, and striped bass from the U.S. is on our Seafood Watch “Best Choices” list! In this easy-to-make curry from chef Raghavan Iyer, the subtle fish is enhanced by perfumed cardamom, sweet fennel, and assertive chiles and garlic. Serve with steaming white basmati rice, sautéed spinach and red bell peppers. Learn more!

About me

The Monterey Bay Aquarium, perched on the edge of a world-famous coastline, is your window to the wonders of the ocean. It’s located on historic Cannery Row in Monterey and is open daily except Christmas Day.

For more information about our animals and exhibits, and to view our live web cams, please visit www.montereybayaquarium.org.

Hours of operation vary by season. Daily schedules and tickets are available on our website or by calling
(831) 648-4800.